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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 176 - 200 of 827
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Helen Louise Cohen
Helen Louise Cohen

Helen Louise Cohen made modern and classic plays more accessible to high school students around the country through her widely used anthologies.

March 17, 1882
New York, New York
United States
Natalie Cohen cropped
Natalie Cohen

A lifelong lover of tennis, Natalie Cohen made her mark on the sport as both an athlete and a trusted referee.

June 9, 1912
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Elizabeth D. A. Cohen

Called a midwife and a “doctoress,” as she fought for the respect of her colleagues, Elizabeth D. A. Cohen became the first woman doctor recognized by the state of Louisiana and battled to save patients from two epidemics of yellow fever.

February 22, 1820
New York, New York
United States
Cohen, Barbara - still image [media]
Barbara Cohen

In children’s books like Molly’s Pilgrim, Barbara Cohen confronted taboo subjects of assimilation, racism, and cancer with both sensitivity and remarkable honesty.

March 15, 1932
Asbury Park, New Jersey
United States
Jessica Cohen

Jessie Cohen served as editor of the Jewish Review and Observer for most of her life, maintaining an important resource for Jews in the city of Cleveland.

July 11, 1869
Cleveland, Ohio
United States
Cohen, Rosalie - still image [media]
Rosalie Cohen

A lifelong Zionist, Rosalie Cohen worked to promote Jewish culture and education both on a national level and locally in New Orleans.

May 27, 1910
New Orleans, Louisiana
United States
Nina Morais Cohen
Nina Morais Cohen

Nina Morais Cohen organized the Jewish women’s community of Minneapolis as a force for women’s suffrage, community service, and scholarship.

December 6, 1855
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Dianne Cohler-Esses
Dianne Cohler-Esses

Dianne Cohler-Esses broke new ground as not only the first woman from the Syrian-Jewish community to become a rabbi, but also the first non-Orthodox rabbi from that community.

Brooklyn, New York
United States
Fannia Cohn table card
Fannia M. Cohn

Fannia M. Cohn led one of the largest trade unions in the US, but clashed with male leadership for years over her belief in the importance of creating independent institutions to educate workers.

1885
Kletzk
Belarus
Felice Cohn

Felice Cohn was one of Nevada’s first women lawyers and the fourth woman permitted to argue before the US Supreme Court.

May 14, 1884
Carson City, Nevada
United States
Cohn, Mildred - still image [media]
Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

July 13, 1913
New York, New York
United States
bettycomden.jpg - still image [media]
Betty Comden

Betty Comden wrote lyrics and librettos for enduring and beloved musicals like Singin’ in the Rain and Peter Pan, winning some of the industry’s highest honors.

May 3, 1917
New York, New York
United States
Claribel Cone, Gertrude Stein, and Etta Cone
Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

November 14, 1864
Richmond, Virginia
United States
Claribel Cone, Gertrude Stein, and Etta Cone
Etta Cone

With her sister Claribel, Etta Cone amassed one of the largest private art collections in the world, becoming a major supporter of artists like Matisse and Picasso.

November 30, 1870
Jonesboro, Tennessee
United States
Molly Cone
Molly Cone

Molly Lamken Cone produced more than forty children’s books in her career, ranging from young adult novels to introductions to Judaism for younger readers.

October 3, 1918
Tacoma, Washington
United States
Copeland, Lillian - still image [media]
Lillian Copeland

Lillian Copeland was the epitome of a strong woman with a remarkable career, first as a record-setting Olympic medalist and later as an officer in the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

November 25, 1904
New York, New York
United States
Jo Copeland

Starting her career at a time when American fashion slavishly copied Paris designs, Jo Copeland created glamorous outfits that were uniquely American.

1899
New York, New York
United States
Lucille Corcos

Lucille Corcos was celebrated as one of the foremost “modern primitivist” painters in America, creating scenes where the outside walls of buildings fell away to reveal the lives of those within.

September 21, 1908
New York, New York
United States
Dr. Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori
Gerty Theresa Cori

Gerty Cori’s work on carbohydrate metabolism, which changed our understanding of diabetes and other diseases, earned her the Nobel Prize for Medicine, making her the first American woman and third woman ever given the honor.

August 15, 1896
Prague
Czech Republic
Rose Laub Coser

Sociologist Rose Laub Coser redefined major concepts in role theory—the idea that our actions are largely dictated by our roles in society—and applied them to expectations of women’s roles in the family and the workplace.

May 4, 1916
Berlin
Germany
Rachel Cowan
Rachel Cowan

As one of the founders of the Jewish healing movement, Rachel Cowan blended modern holistic medicine and counseling with traditional Jewish rituals and prayers to help change how people responded to illness.

Selma Cronan
Selma Cronan

Selma Kantor Cronan flew as a pilot both running transport missions during WWII and later as a civilian, winning competitive aerial races.

1913
Asbury Park, New Jersey
United States
Ray Karchmer Daily
Ray Karchmer Daily

Ophthalmologist Ray Karchmer Daily fought to eliminate the subtle barriers that kept others from succeeding, arguing for dormitories for female medical students and free school lunches for needy children.

March 16, 1891
Vilna, Vilnius
Lithuania
Helen Miller Dalsheimer
Helen Miller Dalsheimer

Helen Miller Dalsheimer took on leadership roles both locally through her synagogue, the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and on a national level.

April 16, 1900
Baltimore, Maryland
United States
Shoshana Damari
Shoshana Damari

Shoshana Damari’s lush voice and her fusion of Eastern and Western musical aesthetics made her the voice of a generation in Israeli music.

March 31, 1923
Dhamar
Yemen

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on November 29, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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