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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

Profiles

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 1157
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Selina Greenbaum

Seeing a need for young women to experience some freedom from the oppressive conditions of factory work, Selina Greenbaum created country resorts where women could take a much–needed vacation.

April 6, 1866
New York, New York
United States
Blu Greenberg
Blu Greenberg

Arguing that feminism could become a way into Judaism instead of a reason to leave the faith, JOFA founder Blu Greenberg created new possibilities for Orthodox feminist Jews.

January 21, 1936
Seattle, Washington
United States
Aliza Greenblatt

Aliza Greenblatt’s career led her on two very different Jewish journeys, as a philanthropist who organized massive support for the State of Israel, and as a popular Yiddish poet.

1885
Azarenits, Bessarabia
Romania
Gloria Greenfield
Gloria Greenfield

Disturbed by growing anti-Semitism in the women’s movement, Gloria Greenfield left the movement and began creating documentary films that brought national attention to anti-Semitism in America and around the world.

Lexington, Massachusetts
United States
Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

March 1, 1881
Memphis, Tennessee
United States
Haika Grosman

From Zionist leadership in war-wracked Europe to her career in the Israeli Knesset, Haika Grosman displayed uncommon strength of character and steadfastness to her ideals.

November 20, 1919
Bialystok, Podlaskie
Poland
Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman helped make American printmaking a respected medium through Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), the studio and publishing house she founded in 1957.

June 30, 1904
Ekaterinburg
Russia
Jennie Grossinger
Jennie Grossinger

Jennie Grossinger became the driving force behind the famed Catskills resort referred to as “Waldorf on the Hudson.”

June 16, 1892
Galicia
Hungary
Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

June 10, 1879
Cleveland, Ohio
United States
Ruth Gruber
Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber didn’t just record history, she made history as the youngest-ever PhD, an honorary general, and the reporter who covered the famed voyage of the Exodus 1947.

September 30, 1911
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Sidonie Gruenberg cover
Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg

As director of the Child Study Association of America, Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg blended the best research on child development and her own experience as a mother of four to offer advice to parents.

June 10, 1881
Vienna
Austria
Rose Gruening

Rose Gruening created a number of social assistance organizations to aid immigrant families, offering practical help that included childcare, funding for college educations, and even a summer camp.

1876
New York, New York
United States
Peggy Guggenheim

Marguerite “Peggy” Guggenheim amassed one of Italy’s most important modern art collections despite the chaos of WWII.

August 26, 1898
New York, New York
United States
Florence Guggenheim cropped
Florence Shloss Guggenheim

A lifelong philanthropist and cofounder of the Guggenheim Foundation, Florence Shloss Guggenheim supported arts and music, including free concerts in Central Park.

September 3, 1863
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Irene Rothschild Guggenheim

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim founded the Brightside Day Nursery and made it her life’s work, overseeing children’s services from day care for newborns to vocational training for teenagers.

December 16, 1868
New York, New York
United States
Ida Espen Guggenheimer

Ida Espen Guggenheimer supported Zionism, civil rights, and feminism throughout her life, from hosting talks on birth control to supporting political prisoners.

December 8, 1866
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

April 11, 1912
New York, New York
United States
Lani Guinier
Lani Guinier

Lani Guinier’s groundbreaking work in law and civil rights theory led to her becoming the first woman of color granted tenure at Harvard Law School.

April 19, 1950
New York, New York
United States
Marjorie Guthrie

The daughter of poet Aliza Greenblatt, wife of singer Woody Guthrie, and mother of singer Arlo Guthrie, Marjorie Guthrie became formidable in her own right as an activist for Huntington’s Disease and other genetic and neurological diseases.

October 6, 1917
Atlantic City, New Jersey
United States
Maggie Gyllenhaal
Maggie Gyllenhaal

Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal has garnered critical acclaim for her performance in difficult roles in 2002’s Secretary, 2009’s Crazy Heart, and 2014’s The Honourable Woman.

November 16, 1977
New York, New York
United States
Barbara Jacobs Haber
Barbara Jacobs Haber

Barbara Jacobs Haber focused her civil rights activism on sit-ins and desegregating restaurants and bars.

1938
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Ida Haendel

A musical prodigy who began playing at age three and performing at age four, Ida Haendel continued her passionate violin performances into her late eighties.

December 15, 1928
Chelm
Poland
Nan Halperin growing up
Nan Halperin

Nan Halpern became famous on the vaudeville stage not just for her comic performances but for the rapid costume changes that earned her the nickname “The Wonder Girl.”

1898
Odessa
Russia
Edith Gregor Halpert

Edith Gregor Halpert helped influence American artistic tastes through her galleries championing both modern and folk art.

April 25, 1900
Odessa
Ukraine
Anna Halprin
Anna Halprin

Anna Halprin was one of the founders of postmodern dance, but her focus has been on dance as a healing art, creating companies for dancers living with HIV and AIDS.

July 13, 1920
Wilmette, Illinois
United States

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Profiles." (Viewed on May 27, 2015) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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