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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 729
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Joan Kahn

Called “publishing’s grande dame of detective stories” by the LA Times in 1988, Joan Kahn had such a gift for choosing and editing bestselling mystery novels that her publisher put her name on their book covers to entice readers.

April 13, 1914
New York, New York
United States
Mascha Kaléko

Through her celebrated satirical poetry, Mascha Kaléko voiced her experience of the growing threat of Nazism in Germany and the pain of being a refugee.

July 6, 1907
Chrzanow
Poland
Kalich-Bertha-cropped
Bertha Kalich

A distinguished performer, Bertha Kalich performed 125 roles in seven languages and became the first actress to make the transition from Yiddish theater to mainstream American drama in film, radio, and on stage.

May 17, 1874
Lemberg
Ukraine
Lizzie Black Kander

With her typical ingenuity, Lizzie Black Kander turned the recipe book she made for a cooking class for new immigrants into a two-million-copy bestseller.

May 28, 1858
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
United States
Fay Kanin

Told that women could only write movies about dating and relationships, Fay Kanin defied conventional wisdom to write award-winning dramas about subjects ranging from prostitution to deaths in Vietnam.

May 9, 1917
New York, New York
United States
Kaplan, Anna - still image [media]
Anna Kaplan

Anna Kaplan helped transform nursing in Israel by holding it to the best standards of medical care from around the world.

Bialystok
Poland
Mordecai Kaplan

The founder of Reconstructionist Judaism, Mordecai Kaplan struck a fundamental blow for women’s participation in Jewish ritual with the bat mitzvah of his eldest daughter, Judith.

June 11, 1881
Russia
Hadassah nurses Rachel Landy and Rose Kaplan with Eva Leon, Jerusalem, 1913
Rose Kaplan

Despite her own failing health, Rose Kaplan insisted on nursing Jewish settlers in Palestine and refugees in Egypt and inspired others to follow her example.

September 4, 1867
St. Petersburg
Russia
Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure. Kaplan practiced estate law from 1946–1952 but left to become director of Junior Hadassah, feeling a need to participate more in the Jewish community. Beginning in 1956, she was a five-time delegate to the World Zionist Congress.

1923
New York, New York
United States
Regina Kaplan

Regina “Kappy” Kaplan helped break down gender barriers in medicine by creating the first nursing school in the South that admitted male students.

May 12, 1887
Memphis, Tennessee
United States
Donna Karan

Donna Karan brought a modern sensibility to women’s clothing by designing interchangeable pieces in simple black and bold colors that were meant for professional women, not just fashion runway models.

October 2, 1948
Forest Hills, New York
United States
N. May Karff

May Karff made her mark in the traditionally male bastion of professional chess as the first woman champion of the United States in 1938.

1914
Russia
Ilona Karmel

Ilona Karmel wrote two powerful novels based on her experiences in the Holocaust and its aftermath.

August 19, 1925
Cracow
Poland
Fay Berger Karpf

Fay Berger Karpf made major contributions to social science with her analysis of the history of social psychology and her discussions of Otto Rank’s theories of psychology.

April 17, 1891
Austria
Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

1888
Belarus
Kaufman, Joyce - still image [media]
Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

June 21, 1929
Bronx, New York
United States
Sue Kaufman

Sue Kaufman’s 1967 breakout novel, Diary of a Mad Housewife, earned her a reputation for writing subtly brutal novels about the isolation and frustration of city life.

August 7, 1926
Long Island, New York
United States
Lyalya Kaufman

The daughter of the acclaimed writer Sholom Aleichem and the mother of celebrated novelist Bel Kaufman, Lyalya Kaufman was revered in her own right for her thousands of vignettes and short stories in Yiddish.

1887
Belaya Tserkov
Ukraine
Bel Kaufman
Bel Kaufman

Bel Kaufman used her experiences as a public school teacher as fodder for her bestselling novel, Up the Down Staircase.

May 10, 1911
Berlin, Berlin
Germany
Rhoda Kaufman

Rhoda Kaufman helped create social welfare organizations throughout Georgia and overcame prejudice against her religion and gender to become one of the most respected social reformers in the country.

October 26, 1888
Columbus, Georgia
United States
Beatrice Kaufman

A member of the famed Algonquin Round Table, Beatrice Kaufman made an impact on the American literary scene both for publishing important modernist writers and for writing her own subversively feminist stories and plays.

January 20, 1895
Rochester, New York
United States
Kaufman, Shirley - still image [media]
Shirley Kaufman

Shirley Kaufman used her Jewish heritage to create evocative poetry, exploring biblical matriarchs, her own mother’s immigrant past, and the tensions of daily life in modern Israel.

June 5, 1923
Seattle, Washington
United States
Lillian Kasindorf Kavey

Lillian Kasondorf Kavey helped immigrants escape Eastern Europe by cutting the red tape that prevented their relatives from saving enough money to bring them to America.

July 19, 1889
New York, New York
United States
Judith Kaye
Judith S. Kaye

As the first woman to serve as chief judge of the state of New York, Judith S. Kaye transformed the state’s entire court system to better handle its overwhelming caseload.

August 4, 1938
Monticello, New York
United States
Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz
Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz

Both in her activism and in her writing, Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz offered Jews new ways to think about and fight racism.

New York, New York
United States

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on October 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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