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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

Profiles

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 1234
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Miriam Glickman cropped
Miriam Cohen Glickman

One of the first white women to do field work for the civil rights movement in the South, Miriam Cohen Glickman was assumed to be black by the locals, who called her “bright,” a word for light-skinned African Americans.

1942
Indiana
United States
Alma Gluck
Alma Gluck

Alma Gluck began her career as an opera singer, but it was her love of American folk songs that made her a bestselling musical artist.

May 11, 1884
Romania
Eleanor Glueck

Eleanor Glueck and her husband Sheldon did massive statistical modeling and follow-up studies to uncover the roots of criminal behavior, revolutionizing the field of criminology.

April 12, 1898
New York, New York
United States
Judy Gold cropped
Judy Gold

Standup comedian Judy Gold won two Daytime Emmys for her work writing and producing the Rosie O’Donnell Show in 1998 and 1999.

November 15, 1962
Newark, New Jersey
United States
Doris Bauman Gold, 2002
Doris Bauman Gold

Doris Bauman Gold founded Biblio Press to offer Jewish women a better sense of their history and to create a venue for authors of new feminist rituals and prayers.

November 21, 1919
New York, New York
United States
Esther Schiff Goldfrank

Although she never earned a degree in anthropology or taught a class, Esther Schiff Goldfrank made significant contributions to the field through her studies of communities as disparate as Pueblo Indians and New Yorkers.

May 5, 1896
New York, New York
United States
Gertrude Goldhaber
Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber

During a career limited time and again by her gender, her religion, and her marital status, physicist Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber helped ensure other women scientists would not face the same hurdles.

July 14, 1911
Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg
Germany
Sulamith Goldhaber, October 18, 1963
Sulamith Goldhaber

Sulamith Löw Goldhaber’s pioneering work with particle accelerators put her at the forefront of a seismic shift in the research of particle physics.

November 4, 1923
Vienna
Austria
Nan Goldin
Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin has used her photography to honor both the courage and the gritty reality of subjects ranging from drag queens to new parents.

September 12, 1953
Washington, District Of Columbia
United States
Hetty Goldman
Hetty Goldman

Working in Greece and Turkey despite the chaos of war, Hetty Goldman patiently uncovered subtle clues to daily life in ancient villages.

December 19, 1881
New York, New York
United States
Emma Goldman
Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman’s controversial beliefs made her many powerful enemies, but their attempts to silence her ironically led to greater protections of free speech in America.

June 27, 1869
Kovno, Kaunas
Lithuania
Josephine Clara Goldmark
Josephine Clara Goldmark

Josephine Goldmark laid the groundwork for transforming American labor laws by amassing data that forced lawmakers to confront the painful realities of factory work.

October 13, 1877
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Pauline Goldmark

Pauline Goldmark’s talents as a researcher made her indispensable to labor rights initiatives, from investigating the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire to helping lead Columbia University’s School of Social Work.

February 21, 1874
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Edna Goldsmith

The granddaughter of one of the pioneers of Cleveland, Edna Goldsmith devoted her career to creating and leading Jewish women’s organizations within her home state of Ohio.

December 14, 1874
Springfield, Ohio
United States
Luba Robin Goldsmith

A respected doctor and teacher of medicine, Luba Robin Goldsmith created a supportive environment for women who followed her into medicine.

January 17, 1879
Uman
Ukraine
Rose Goldstein

Rose Goldstein worked to support women’s greater involvement in Jewish ritual life through her education work with United Synagogue and her essential guide to Jewish prayer, A Time to Pray: A Personal Approach to the Jewish Prayer Book.

Minneapolis, Minnesota
United States
Shannie Goldstein
Shannie Goldstein

Shannie Goldstein used her creativity to outsmart the KGB, bringing information to and from refuseniks in the Soviet Union.

Lowell, Massachusetts
United States
Fanny Goldstein, first female Judaica librarian
Fanny Goldstein

Fanny Goldstein’s belief in the importance of ethnic and immigrant pride led to her creation of National Jewish Book Week.

May 15, 1895
Kamenets-Podolsk
Russia
Jennie Goldstein
Jennie Goldstein

Jennie Goldstein won the hearts of her audiences playing tragic roles in Yiddish melodramas, but when tastes changed, she showed her versatility by playing comic roles with equal skill.

May 8, 1895
New York, New York
United States
Rebecca Fischel Goldstein

Both as a rabbi’s wife and as a leader in her own right, Rebecca Fischel Goldstein strove to make women a significant force in Orthodox Judaism.

1891
New York, New York
United States
Shafi Goldwasser
Shafi Goldwasser

Shafi Goldwasser was honored with the Turing Award, the highest honor in computer science, for her work in revolutionizing the field of cryptography.

1958
New York, New York
United States
Janice Goodman and Victoria Gray Adams, 1988
Janice Goodman

Janice Goodman’s work on civil rights issues drove her to become a lawyer, arguing class action cases for women’s rights.

1935
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Carolyn Goodman
Carolyn Goodman

As a psychologist, Carolyn Goodman created early intervention programs for at-risk families, but when her son, Andrew Goodman, was killed during Freedom Summer, she became a powerful civil rights activist.

October 6, 1915
Woodmere, New York
United States
Beate Sirota Gordon, 1987
Beate Sirota Gordon

Through diplomacy and ingenuity, twenty-two-year-old Beate Sirota Gordon wrote unprecedented rights for women into Japan’s post-war constitution.

October 25, 1923
Vienna
Austria
Jaimy Gordon, cropped
Jaimy Gordon

Jaimy Gordon won the National Book Award for Lords of Misrule, her novel of horseracing, desperation, and luck set in West Virginia.

July 4, 1944
Baltimore
United States

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Profiles." (Viewed on February 13, 2016) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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