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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 937
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Paula Hyman
Paula Hyman

Paula Hyman’s work as a historian recovered the stories of Jewish women’s pasts, while her work as a member of Ezrat Nashim helped create new possibilities for their future by pushing the Conservative Movement to ordain women rabbis.

September 30, 1946
Boston, Massachusetts
United States
Libbie Henrietta Hyman

Libbie Henrietta Hyman spent her career researching and writing the definitive texts on invertebrates, a monumental effort.

December 6, 1888
Des Moines, Iowa
United States
Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman

In her poems, essays, and short stories, Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman urged her fellow Jews to resist assimilation and understand the power and beauty of their tradition.

September 8, 1812
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Edith Somborn Isaacs

Edith Somborn Isaacs made an impact on New York City both through her own volunteerism and by successfully running her husband’s campaigns for public office.

June 18, 1884
New York, New York
United States
Blanche Frank Ittleson

Blanche Frank Ittleson’s pioneering work in treating and teaching mentally challenged and emotionally disturbed children opened new possibilities for struggling children and their families.

September 27, 1875
St. Louis, Missouri
United States
Shulamit Izen
Shulamit Izen

After realizing at an early age that she was a lesbian, Shulamit Izen devoted herself to creating a supportive environment for Jewish GLBTQ teens.

1984
Lexington, Massachusetts
United States
Anne Jackson
Anne Jackson

Motivated by a desire to experience life and have her voice heard, Anne Jackson participated in community activism ranging from the March on Washington to Holocaust education.

1909
Chelsea, Massachusetts
United States
Lotte Jacobi

A fourth-generation photographer, Lotte Jacobi became known for capturing her subjects, no matter how famous or iconic, in honest, unguarded moments.

August 17, 1896
Thorn
Germany
Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

September 10, 1888
New York, New York
United States
Zipporah Nunes Machado Jacobs

Zipporah Nunes Machado Jacobs escaped the horrors of the Inquisition as a conversa, using clever tricks to keep her devotion to Judaism secret from any who might betray her.

1710
Lisbon
Portugal
Frances Wisebart Jacobs
Frances Wisebart Jacobs

Francis Weisbart Jacobs helped transform the fledgling state of Colorado through her organization of charities and hospitals.

March 29, 1843
Harrodsburg, Kentucky
United States
Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

September 10, 1888
New York, New York
United States
Sada Jacobson

Sada Jacobson won the bronze medal for sabre fencing at the 2004 Olympics (the first Olympics where women were allowed to compete in sabre), then did one better in 2008, bringing home both a silver and another bronze medal.

February 14, 1983
Rochester, Minnesota
United States
Emily Jacobson

Emily Jacobson, raised by a family of fencers, reached the pinnacle of her career when she competed in the 2004 Olympics, which was the first time women were allowed to compete as sabre fencers.

December 2, 1985
Dunwoody, Georgia
United States
Dana Jacobson interviews Admiral
Dana Jacobson

Dana Jacobson has showed resilience in her career as a sportscaster, transitioning from television to radio while remaining a trusted female anchor in a male-dominated field.

November 5, 1971
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
United States
Anna Jacobson

Anna Jacobson fought to continue teaching German language and literature at Hunter College throughout the 1930s and 1940s, at a time when many schools suppressed all things German.

January 10, 1888
Lüneburg
Germany
Janie Jacobson

Janie Jacobson’s love of Jewish tradition led her to create biblical children’s plays that were performed nationwide.

1860
London
United Kingdom
Jean Jaffe

Jean Jaffe’s career was doubly remarkable: she was a field reporter at a time when women were usually relegated to the society pages and a Yiddish-language journalist at a time when most American reporters wrote in English.

April 20, 1900
Lithuania
Jahoda, Marie - still image [media]
Marie Jahoda

Marie Jahoda was a major figure in psychology for her work on the effects of unemployment on emotional well-being as well as the social impact of McCarthy-era blacklisting.

January 26, 1907
Vienna
Austria
Jarblum, Laura 2 - still image [media]
Laura Margolis Jarblum

Laura Margolis Jarblum’s deft management of wartime social services on three different continents for the Joint Distribution Committee saved the lives of thousands.

1903
Constantinople
Turkey
Marie Grunfeld Jastrow

It took until she was eighty-two for Marie Grunfeld Jastrow to find a publisher for her autobiographies, but her two compelling memoirs of coming of age as a Jewish immigrant in New York touched audiences deeply.

June 10, 1898
Danzig
Poland
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

Known for her long-time collaboration with Merchant Ivory Films, novelist Ruth Prawer Jhabvala is the only writer to have won both a Booker Prize and the Academy Award for her work.

May 7, 1927
Cologne
Germany
Tziporah H. Jochsberger

Having escaped the Holocaust on the strength of her musical talents, Tziporah H. Jochsberger went on to use music to instill Jewish pride in her students.

December 27, 1920
Leutershausen
Germany
Lydia Joel

Lydia Joel began her dance career as a performer, but it was as the editor of Dance Magazine that she had the greatest impact on the field.

July 27, 1914
New York, New York
United States
Regina Jonas Cropped
Regina Jonas

Regina Jonas made history as the first woman rabbi after writing a thesis arguing for the halakhic permissibility of women’s ordination.

August 3, 1902
Berlin
Germany

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on January 30, 2015) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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