You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share
Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

Profiles

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

Filter People

Showing 476 - 500 of 1173
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Vera Gordon

Throughout her long career on stage and screen, Vera Gordon portrayed Jewish mothers in a positive light—with warmth and deep emotion.

June 11, 1886
Ekaterinoslav
Russia
Jaimy Gordon Headshot
Jaimy Gordon

Jaimy Gordon won the National Book Award for Lords of Misrule, her novel of horseracing, desperation, and luck set in West Virginia.

July 4, 1944
Baltimore
United States
Lesley Gore Album Cover
Lesley Gore

Known for the feminist anthem “You Don’t Own Me,” teenage pop sensation Lesley Gore carefully negotiated which parts of her life the media did and did not own.

May 2, 1946
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme
Eydie Gorme

Eydie Gorme’s regular musical appearances on Steve Allen’s Tonight! Show with her husband, Steve Lawrence, launched their joint careers as the duo responsible for hits like 1963’s “Blame It on the Bossa Nova.”

August 16, 1928
New York
United States
Vivian Gornick

Vivian Gornick chronicled her own feminist awakening and that of the country through both her journalism for the Village Voice and her powerful memoirs.

June 14, 1935
Bronx, New York
United States
Jackie Gothard headshot
Jackie Gothard

The first female president of her childhood synagogue, Congregation Beth Israel, Jackie Gothard helped the Orthodox synagogue rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.

September 21, 1934
New Orleans, Louisiana
United States
Gotsfeld, Bessie - still image [media]
Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld helped organize American Mizrachi Women (now known as AMIT), pushed for its independence from men’s groups, and made aiding children in Israel a major goal of the organization.

1888
Przemysl, Podkarpackie
Poland
Jeane Herskovits Gottesman

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman helped raise essential funds for Jewish organizations ranging from Yeshiva University to Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah program, which helped save Jewish children from Europe during the Holocaust.

1893
New York, New York
United States
Sally Gottesman
Sally Gottesman

As a teenager, Sally Gottesman lobbied for the first Saturday morning bat mitzvah at her synagogue; as an adult, she created groups for teens of both genders to discover a deeper connection to Judaism.

Gottheil, Emma - still image [media]
Emma Leon Gottheil

As a translator, Emma Leon Gottheil helped spread the ideals of Zionism across America, but as founder of the Women’s League for Palestine, she helped turn those ideals into practical reality.

1862
Beirut
Lebanon
Lynn Gottlieb
Lynn Gottlieb

One of the first ten women rabbis, Lynn Gottlieb became a voice for peace between Jews and Muslims.

April 12, 1949
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
United States
Portrait of Rebecca Gratz
Rebecca Gratz

Through the schools and orphanages she created, Rebecca Gratz established a new model of religious education and made it possible for a new generation to identify as both fully Jewish and fully American.

March 4, 1781
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Richea Gratz

Richea Gratz became the first Jewish woman to attend college in America in 1787, at the age of thirteen.

October 1, 1774
Selina Greenbaum

Seeing a need for young women to experience some freedom from the oppressive conditions of factory work, Selina Greenbaum created country resorts where women could take a much–needed vacation.

April 6, 1866
New York, New York
United States
Blu Greenberg
Blu Greenberg

Arguing that feminism could become a way into Judaism instead of a reason to leave the faith, JOFA founder Blu Greenberg created new possibilities for Orthodox feminist Jews.

January 21, 1936
Seattle, Washington
United States
Aliza Greenblatt

Aliza Greenblatt’s career led her on two very different Jewish journeys, as a philanthropist who organized massive support for the State of Israel, and as a popular Yiddish poet.

1885
Azarenits, Bessarabia
Romania
Gloria Greenfield
Gloria Greenfield

Disturbed by growing anti-Semitism in the women’s movement, Gloria Greenfield left the movement and began creating documentary films that brought national attention to anti-Semitism in America and around the world.

Lexington, Massachusetts
United States
Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

March 1, 1881
Memphis, Tennessee
United States
Haika Grosman

From Zionist leadership in war-wracked Europe to her career in the Israeli Knesset, Haika Grosman displayed uncommon strength of character and steadfastness to her ideals.

November 20, 1919
Bialystok, Podlaskie
Poland
Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman helped make American printmaking a respected medium through Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), the studio and publishing house she founded in 1957.

June 30, 1904
Ekaterinburg
Russia
Jennie Grossinger
Jennie Grossinger

Jennie Grossinger became the driving force behind the famed Catskills resort referred to as “Waldorf on the Hudson.”

June 16, 1892
Galicia
Hungary
Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

June 10, 1879
Cleveland, Ohio
United States
Ruth Gruber
Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber didn’t just record history, she made history as the youngest-ever PhD, an honorary general, and the reporter who covered the famed voyage of the Exodus 1947.

September 30, 1911
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Sidonie Gruenberg cover
Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg

As director of the Child Study Association of America, Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg blended the best research on child development and her own experience as a mother of four to offer advice to parents.

June 10, 1881
Vienna
Austria
Rose Gruening

Rose Gruening created a number of social assistance organizations to aid immigrant families, offering practical help that included childcare, funding for college educations, and even a summer camp.

1876
New York, New York
United States

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Profiles." (Viewed on July 29, 2015) <http://jwa.org/people>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs