You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share
Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

Filter People

Showing 476 - 500 of 561
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Schornstein_Oconnor
Florence Schornstein

Florence Schornstein spent a lifetime making New Orleans a better place to live, and Hurricane Katrina only strengthened her resolve.

New Orleans, Louisiana
United States
Denise Schorr
Denise Schorr

As a member of the French Resistance, Denise Schorr began saving Jewish children when she was still just seventeen.

September 20, 1918
Paris
France
Debra L. Schultz
Debra L. Schultz

Debra Schultz served as an advisor to the Jewish Women’s Archive in creating the Living the Legacy curriculum based on research she had done on the history of Jewish women in the civil rights movement.

Laurie Schwab Zabin
Laurie Schwab Zabin

Laurie Schwab Zabin’s work in reproductive health changed how Americans approach sex education and teen pregnancy.

1926
Barbara Seaman
Barbara Seaman

Medical journalist Barbara Seaman exposed the risks of birth control pills, making them the first–ever prescription drug to include an FDA warning health on possible side effects.

September 11, 1935
Letter from Henrietta Szold to Alice Seligsberg, October 8, 1931
Alice Lillie Seligsberg

Alice Lillie Seligsberg dedicated her life to caring for orphans, first in America and then in Israel.

August 8, 1873
New York, New York
United States
Gertrude Shapiro
Gertrude Shapiro

A nurse who put her patients before herself, Gertrude Shapiro travelled to Hiroshima to treat the injured after the city suffered an atomic blast.

Clara Lemlich in a shirtwaist
Clara Lemlich Shavelson

Clara Lemlich Shavelson pushed union leaders to recognize the importance of women in the labor movement and organized vital demonstrations for worker’s rights and cost-of-living issues.

1886
Gorodok
Ukraine
Lynn Sherr
Lynn Sherr

Believing that the stories of strong women needed to be remembered and honored, reporter Lynn Sherr covered women’s issues as a journalist and brought the story of Susan B. Anthony to a new generation.

March 4, 1942
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Abby Shevitz
Abby Shevitz

In her work on AIDS and HIV, Abby Shevitz became an advocate for patients who often had no one else to turn to.

1959
Pikesville, Maryland
United States
Dinah Shore
Dinah Shore

Dinah Shore was one of the top recording artists of the 1940s, with hits like “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” before starting a new career in the 1970s as a talk show host who prized conversation over confrontation.

March 1, 1917
Winchester, Tennessee
United States
Alix Kates Shulman
Alix Kates Shulman

From her radical marriage contract to her lyrical novels and memoirs, Alex Kates Shulman’s honesty and willingness to share her story helped shape the conversation about women’s liberation.

August 17, 1932
Cleveland, Ohio
United States
Betsy Shure Gross
Betsy Shure Gross

Betsy Shure Gross’s love of nature and open spaces led her to restore a local treasure: the last surviving linear park designed by Frederick Law Olmstead.

New Haven, Connecticut
United States
Sylvia Sidney
Sylvia Sidney

In contrast to the helpless waif she played so perfectly on screen, in real life Sylvia Sidney was a strong, opinionated woman who was unafraid to challenge some of the top Hollywood directors of her time.

August 8, 1910
Bronx, New York
United States
Beverly Sills
Beverly Sills

Beverly Sills may not have performed at the Metropolitan Opera House until age forty-five, but her impact on the opera world as both a singer and as the first female director of the New York City Opera Company (NYCO) was beyond measure.

May 25, 1929
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Silver, Joan - still image [media]
Joan Micklin Silver

Joan Micklin Silver bucked Hollywood assumptions about what made a successful film, becoming a critically acclaimed director of independent films with Jewish themes like Hester Street and Crossing Delancey.

May 24, 1935
Omaha, Nevada
United States
Carol Ruth Silver
Carol Ruth Silver

Carol Ruth Silver was the first white woman to be jailed in the Freedom Rides, an experience that sparked a career in law and politics, fighting for the rights of others.

October 1, 1938
Boston, Massachusetts
United States
Marita Silverman
Marita Silverman

Marita Silverman used the compassion and strength she learned working as a nurse in a field hospital in Vietnam to fuel her work in civilian life as a pediatric nurse.

Portsmouth, Virginia
United States
Simon, Caroline cropped
Caroline Klein Simon

Caroline Klein Simon fought for gender and racial equality and made the first laws against real estate brokers using “blockbusting” tactics to force sales of homes.

November 12, 1900
New York, New York
United States
Singer, Maxine - still image [media]
Maxine Singer

Maxine Singer helped shape the emerging field of genetics as a researcher, educator, and medical ethicist.

February 15, 1931
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Frances Slanger
Frances Slanger

One of four nurses to wade ashore at Normandy Beach on D-Day, Frances Slanger was the only nurse to die as a result of enemy action in the European Theater.

1913
Lodz, Lodzkie
Poland
Joan Snyder
Joan Snyder

Joan Snyder’s abstract expressionist paintings, often created using unconventional materials and techniques, ushered in a new era of feminist art.

April 16, 1940
Highland Park, New Jersey
United States
Sokolow dancing
Anna Sokolow

Anna Sokolow pushed the boundaries of modern dance, using her performances to explore important social issues and the darkest human emotions.

February 9, 1910
Hartford, Connecticut
United States
Rivka Solomon
Rivka Solomon

Despite Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Rivka Solomon has used her skills as a writer and activist to bring attention to women’s stories of courage.

1962
Hannah Solomon
Hannah Greenebaum Solomon

In creating the first national association for Jewish women, Hannah Greenebaum Solomon redefined the roles they could play in American society.

January 14, 1858
Chicago, Illinois
United States

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on July 30, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs