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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 763
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Tziporah H. Jochsberger

Having escaped the Holocaust on the strength of her musical talents, Tziporah H. Jochsberger went on to use music to instill Jewish pride in her students.

December 27, 1920
Leutershausen
Germany
Lydia Joel

Lydia Joel began her dance career as a performer, but it was as the editor of Dance Magazine that she had the greatest impact on the field.

July 27, 1914
New York, New York
United States
Regina Jonas Cropped
Regina Jonas

Regina Jonas made history as the first woman rabbi after writing a thesis arguing for the halakhic permissibility of women’s ordination.

August 3, 1902
Berlin
Germany
Geri M. Joseph

Geri M. Joseph distinguished herself both as a journalist covering vital stories and as US ambassador to the Netherlands during a diplomatic crisis.

June 19, 1923
St. Paul, Minnesota
United States
Helen Joseph

Called the “grandmother of American puppetry“ for her definitive history of puppets and marionettes, Helen Haiman Joseph was also known for her own practice of the craft as a talented designer and director.

August 28, 1888
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Hannah Jukovsky
Hannah Jukovsky

Hannah Jukovsky made headlines when she organized a boycott of standardized testing to draw attention to class and race inequities in Massachusetts public schools.

1984
Cambridge, Massachusetts
United States
Jungreis, Esther - still image [media]
Esther Jungreis

Esther Jungreis played a significant role in drawing nonobservant young Jews to Orthodox Judaism through her dynamic public speaking and her organization, Hineni.

1936
Szeged
Hungary
Joan Kahn

Called “publishing’s grande dame of detective stories” by the LA Times in 1988, Joan Kahn had such a gift for choosing and editing bestselling mystery novels that her publisher put her name on their book covers to entice readers.

April 13, 1914
New York, New York
United States
Madeline Kahn cropped
Madeline Kahn

Madeline Kahn acted in dramas and musicals on stage, film, and television, but she was best known for her comedic roles as Mel Brooks’s favorite female lead.

September 29, 1942
Boston, Massachusetts
United States
Dorothy C. Kahn

During the Depression, Dorothy C. Kahn helped pioneer social work as a service provided by the government to all who needed it, instead of the responsibility of just private or religious charities.

1893
Seattle, Washington
United States
Florence Prag Kahn
Florence Prag Kahn

Florence Prag Kahn made history as the first Jewish woman to serve in Congress, first filling her husband’s seat and then in her own right, with Alice Roosevelt Longworth commenting that she was “the equal of any man in Congress, and the superior of most.”

November 9, 1866
Salt Lake City, Utah
United States
Mascha Kaléko

Through her celebrated satirical poetry, Mascha Kaléko voiced her experience of the growing threat of Nazism in Germany and the pain of being a refugee.

July 6, 1907
Chrzanow
Poland
Kalich-Bertha-cropped
Bertha Kalich

A distinguished performer, Bertha Kalich performed 125 roles in seven languages and became the first actress to make the transition from Yiddish theater to mainstream American drama in film, radio, and on stage.

May 17, 1874
Lemberg
Ukraine
Lizzie Black Kander

With her typical ingenuity, Lizzie Black Kander turned the recipe book she made for a cooking class for new immigrants into a two-million-copy bestseller.

May 28, 1858
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
United States
Fay Kanin

Told that women could only write movies about dating and relationships, Fay Kanin defied conventional wisdom to write award-winning dramas about subjects ranging from prostitution to deaths in Vietnam.

May 9, 1917
New York, New York
United States
Rusty Kanokogi
Rusty Kanokogi

The first woman allowed to train with male judo students at Japan’s judo headquarters, the Kodokan, Rena “Rusty” Kanokogi pioneered women’s judo as an Olympic sport.

July 30, 1935
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Kaplan, Anna - still image [media]
Anna Kaplan

Anna Kaplan helped transform nursing in Israel by holding it to the best standards of medical care from around the world.

Bialystok
Poland
Mordecai Kaplan

The founder of Reconstructionist Judaism, Mordecai Kaplan struck a fundamental blow for women’s participation in Jewish ritual with the bat mitzvah of his eldest daughter, Judith.

June 11, 1881
Russia
Hadassah nurses Rachel Landy and Rose Kaplan with Eva Leon, Jerusalem, 1913
Rose Kaplan

Despite her own failing health, Rose Kaplan insisted on nursing Jewish settlers in Palestine and refugees in Egypt and inspired others to follow her example.

September 4, 1867
St. Petersburg
Russia
Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure. Kaplan practiced estate law from 1946–1952 but left to become director of Junior Hadassah, feeling a need to participate more in the Jewish community. Beginning in 1956, she was a five-time delegate to the World Zionist Congress.

1923
New York, New York
United States
Regina Kaplan

Regina “Kappy” Kaplan helped break down gender barriers in medicine by creating the first nursing school in the South that admitted male students.

May 12, 1887
Memphis, Tennessee
United States
Donna Karan

Donna Karan brought a modern sensibility to women’s clothing by designing interchangeable pieces in simple black and bold colors that were meant for professional women, not just fashion runway models.

October 2, 1948
Forest Hills, New York
United States
N. May Karff

May Karff made her mark in the traditionally male bastion of professional chess as the first woman champion of the United States in 1938.

1914
Russia
Ilona Karmel

Ilona Karmel wrote two powerful novels based on her experiences in the Holocaust and its aftermath.

August 19, 1925
Cracow
Poland
Fay Berger Karpf

Fay Berger Karpf made major contributions to social science with her analysis of the history of social psychology and her discussions of Otto Rank’s theories of psychology.

April 17, 1891
Austria

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on October 24, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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