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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.


Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 476 - 500 of 1193
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Rose Goldstein

Rose Goldstein worked to support women’s greater involvement in Jewish ritual life through her education work with United Synagogue and her essential guide to Jewish prayer, A Time to Pray: A Personal Approach to the Jewish Prayer Book.

Minneapolis, Minnesota
United States
Shannie Goldstein
Shannie Goldstein

Shannie Goldstein used her creativity to outsmart the KGB, bringing information to and from refuseniks in the Soviet Union.

Lowell, Massachusetts
United States
Fanny Goldstein, first female Judaica librarian
Fanny Goldstein

Fanny Goldstein’s belief in the importance of ethnic and immigrant pride led to her creation of National Jewish Book Week.

May 15, 1895
Goldstein, Jennie - still image [media]
Jennie Goldstein

Jennie Goldstein won the hearts of her audiences playing tragic roles in Yiddish melodramas, but when tastes changed, she showed her versatility by playing comic roles with equal skill.

May 8, 1895
New York, New York
United States
Rebecca Fischel Goldstein

Both as a rabbi’s wife and as a leader in her own right, Rebecca Fischel Goldstein strove to make women a significant force in Orthodox Judaism.

New York, New York
United States
Janice Goodman
Janice Goodman

Janice Goodman’s work on civil rights issues drove her to become a lawyer, arguing class action cases for women’s rights.

Brooklyn, New York
United States
goodman_young.jpg - still image [media]
Carolyn Goodman

As a psychologist, Carolyn Goodman created early intervention programs for at-risk families, but when her son, Andrew Goodman, was killed during Freedom Summer, she became a powerful civil rights activist.

October 6, 1915
Woodmere, New York
United States
Jaimy Gordon Headshot
Jaimy Gordon

Jaimy Gordon won the National Book Award for Lords of Misrule, her novel of horseracing, desperation, and luck set in West Virginia.

July 4, 1944
United States
Maralee Gordon
Maralee Gordon

Rabbi Maralee Gordon helped found the Chutzpah Collective, a radical Jewish political collective that utilized the inclusion of women in religious rituals as a jumping-off point for making all Jews feel welcome in the Jewish community regardless of disability or sexual orientation.

Crystal Lake, Illinois
United States
Dorothy Lerner Gordon

Dorothy Lerner Gordon used radio and television to give children access to literature, music, and news of current events.

April 4, 1889
Jean Gordon

Already a successful businesswoman who had created a popular textile company, Jean Gordon launched a remarkable second career as the owner and publisher of Dance Magazine.

November 1, 1903
New York, New York
United States
Beate Sirota Gordon
Beate Sirota Gordon

Through diplomacy and ingenuity, twenty-two-year-old Beate Sirota Gordon wrote unprecedented rights for women into Japan’s post-war constitution.

October 25, 1923
Vera Gordon

Throughout her long career on stage and screen, Vera Gordon portrayed Jewish mothers in a positive light—with warmth and deep emotion.

June 11, 1886
Lesley Gore Album Cover
Lesley Gore

Known for the feminist anthem “You Don’t Own Me,” teenage pop sensation Lesley Gore carefully negotiated which parts of her life the media did and did not own.

May 2, 1946
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme
Eydie Gorme

Eydie Gorme’s regular musical appearances on Steve Allen’s Tonight! Show with her husband, Steve Lawrence, launched their joint careers as the duo responsible for hits like 1963’s “Blame It on the Bossa Nova.”

August 16, 1928
New York
United States
Vivian Gornick

Vivian Gornick chronicled her own feminist awakening and that of the country through both her journalism for the Village Voice and her powerful memoirs.

June 14, 1935
Bronx, New York
United States
Jackie Gothard headshot
Jackie Gothard

The first female president of her childhood synagogue, Congregation Beth Israel, Jackie Gothard helped the Orthodox synagogue rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.

September 21, 1934
New Orleans, Louisiana
United States
Gotsfeld, Bessie - still image [media]
Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld helped organize American Mizrachi Women (now known as AMIT), pushed for its independence from men’s groups, and made aiding children in Israel a major goal of the organization.

Przemysl, Podkarpackie
Jeane Herskovits Gottesman

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman helped raise essential funds for Jewish organizations ranging from Yeshiva University to Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah program, which helped save Jewish children from Europe during the Holocaust.

New York, New York
United States
Sally Gottesman
Sally Gottesman

As a teenager, Sally Gottesman lobbied for the first Saturday morning bat mitzvah at her synagogue; as an adult, she created groups for teens of both genders to discover a deeper connection to Judaism.

Gottheil, Emma - still image [media]
Emma Leon Gottheil

As a translator, Emma Leon Gottheil helped spread the ideals of Zionism across America, but as founder of the Women’s League for Palestine, she helped turn those ideals into practical reality.

Lynn Gottlieb
Lynn Gottlieb

One of the first ten women rabbis, Lynn Gottlieb became a voice for peace between Jews and Muslims.

April 12, 1949
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
United States
Portrait of Rebecca Gratz
Rebecca Gratz

Through the schools and orphanages she created, Rebecca Gratz established a new model of religious education and made it possible for a new generation to identify as both fully Jewish and fully American.

March 4, 1781
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Richea Gratz

Richea Gratz became the first Jewish woman to attend college in America in 1787, at the age of thirteen.

October 1, 1774
Selina Greenbaum

Seeing a need for young women to experience some freedom from the oppressive conditions of factory work, Selina Greenbaum created country resorts where women could take a much–needed vacation.

April 6, 1866
New York, New York
United States


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Profiles." (Viewed on October 10, 2015) <>.


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