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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 26 - 50 of 542
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Naomi Amir

Naomi Kassan Amir was a pioneer in pediatric neurology in part because of her holistic approach, seeing each child not just in terms of their disability but in the context of their family and their community.

January 23, 1931
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Lynn Amowitz
Lynn Amowitz

After years of offering medical help to refugees, Lynn Amowitz decided she needed to solve the problems at their source: the human rights violations driving refugees from their homes.

1964
North Carolina
United States
Birdie Amsterdam

Birdie Amsterdam capped a career of firsts in the legal profession with her role as the first woman elected to the New York State Supreme Court.

March 25, 1901
New York, New York
United States
Annenberg, Sadie - still image [media]
Sadie Cecelia Friedman Annenberg

Sadie Cecelia Friedman Annenberg gave generously to Jewish causes both in the US and Israel.

June 3, 1879
New York, New York
United States
Ruth Nanda Anshen

Ruth Nanda Anshen created connections between the great thinkers of different fields, offering them opportunities to explain their work to each other and the general public.

June 14, 1900
Lynn, Massachusetts
United States
Mary Antin cropped
Mary Antin

An immigrant girl who achieved literary fame at the age of thirteen, Mary Antin became a symbol of the American dream.

June 13, 1881
Polotsk
Russia
Eleanor Antin

Eleanor Antin explored issues of gender, race, and identity by taking on personae of various outsiders in her performance art, installation art, and films.

February 27, 1935
Bronx, New York
United States
Joyce Antler, 2012
Joyce Antler

Using both field research and her own experiences posing as a pregnant woman, Joyce Antler not only helped repeal New York’s laws against abortion, but ensured that women had real access to medical services after the law was repealed.

Boston, Massachusetts
United States
Anna Appel

Anna Appel was known for her performance of motherly characters in Yiddish and English roles on stage and screen.

May 1, 1888
Bucharest
Romania
Diane Arbus

Wildly controversial in her lifetime, Diane Arbus was only fully recognized for her contributions to the art of photography after her death.

March 14, 1923
New York, New York
United States
Rita Arditti photo
Rita Arditti

As a Sephardic Jew from Argentina, Rita Arditti’s experience as “a minority within a minority” drove her to document another invisible group: the grandmothers of the disappeared children.

1934
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Arendt, Hannah - still image [media]
Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt grappled with the Holocaust throughout her lifetime, creating the concept of “the banality of evil” to understand the widespread complicity in the mass killings.

October 14, 1906
Wilhelmine
Germany
Eve Arnold
Eve Arnold

The first American woman accepted into the groundbreaking cooperative Magnum Photos, Eve Arnold was hailed for both her photojournalism and her more artistic work.

April 21, 1913
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Margaret Gene Arnstein

Margaret Gene Arnstein’s belief that nurses should be involved in health policy and research helped transform her profession.

October 27, 1904
New York, New York
United States
Jeannette Arons

Jeannette Arons served in a variety of roles with the National Council of Jewish Women, from helping juvenile offenders rebuild their lives to helping Jewish immigrants become citizens.

July 14, 1881
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Adrien Arpel

Adrien Arpel started her own business two days out of high school, becoming a leader in the field of cosmetics for her innovations in department store makeovers and her belief that women needed knowledgeable advice tailored to their needs.

July 15, 1941
Jersey City, New Jersey
United States
Bea Arthur
Bea Arthur

Bea Arthur made a career of playing formidable, opinionated women in movies and on television.

May 13, 1926
New York, New York
United States
Dora Askowith

Dora Askowith tried to galvanize Jewish students into social activism and leadership by teaching them the history of their faith.

August 30, 1884
Kovno
Russia
Beatrice Fox Auerbach

Beatrice Fox Auerbach ran her family’s department store, G. Fox and Company, for thirty years, introducing innovations to customer service and helping women and minorities climb the corporate ladder.

July 7, 1887
Hartford, Connecticut
United States
Auerbach, Ellen - still image [media]
Ellen Auerbach

Ellen Auerbach was remarkable both for her avant-garde photography and for her innovative and successful ringl+pit studio where she and fellow artist Grete Stern signed all their work collaboratively.

May 20, 1906
Karlsruhe
Germany
Sophie Cahn Axman

Sophie Cahn Axman became known as “the angel of the Tombs” for her work as a probation officer helping troubled children.

July 25, 1865
Washington, District Of Columbia
United States
Self-Portrait by Helene Aylon
Helène Aylon

Through her art, Helène Aylon explored the intersectionality among her feminism, the Orthodox Judaism of her upbringing, and her place in a war-torn world.

February 4, 1931
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall smoldered on screen with what became known as her signature “look,” glancing up with a downturned chin, shining in her roles both alone and opposite her husband, Humphrey Bogart.

September 16, 1924
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Badt-Strauss, Bertha - still image [media]
Bertha Badt-Strauss

Bertha Badt-Strauss used her writing to create a broader range of possible identities for women in the cultural Zionist movement called the Jewish Renaissance.

December 7, 1885
Breslau
Germany
Edith Jacobi Baerwald

Edith Jacobi Baerwald devoted her energy to philanthropic organizations, but also loved connecting directly with the people she helped through her volunteer work at settlement houses.

February 14, 1878
San Francisco, California
United States

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on July 25, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people>.

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