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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 1 - 20 of 20
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Barbara Jacobs Haber
Barbara Jacobs Haber

Barbara Jacobs Haber focused her civil rights activism on sit-ins and desegregating restaurants and bars.

1938
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Anna Halprin
Anna Halprin

Anna Halprin was one of the founders of postmodern dance, but her focus has been on dance as a healing art, creating companies for dancers living with HIV and AIDS.

July 13, 1920
Wilmette, Illinois
United States
Ruth Mosko Handler

Ruth Mosko Handler is best known as the inventor of the Barbie doll, but her most important work may be her prosthetics for survivors of breast cancer.

1916
Denver, Colorado
United States
Rivka Haut
Rivka Haut

An Orthodox Jewish feminist, Rivka Haut advocated on behalf of agunot (chained wives) and wrote feminist prayers for Orthodox Jews.

May 13, 1942
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Nancy Miriam Hawley
Nancy Miriam Hawley

Nancy Miriam Hawley helped found the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Inc., the organization responsible for writing the best seller Our Bodies, Ourselves, which empowered women to take control of their own health care.

Hawn-Goldie-cropped
Goldie Hawn

As an actress, Goldie Hawn became known for playing dumb blondes, but behind the camera, she was determined to fulfill her vision as an executive producer and director.

November 21, 1945
Silver Spring, Maryland
United States
Melissa Hayden
Melissa Hayden

Melissa Hayden showed unparalleled versatility and range in her ballet dancing, prompting choreographers to create roles specifically for her during a career that spanned decades at the top of her profession.

April 23, 1923
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman fought to ensure that women’s tennis was taken seriously and that women players competed for the same prize money as men.

May 13, 1922
New York, New York
United States
Lillian Hellman

Lillian Hellman displayed courage not only in her writing of powerful and controversial plays like The Children’s Hour, but in her public refusal to name colleagues to the House Un-American Activities Committee.

June 20, 1905
New Orleans, Louisiana
United States
Diana Mara Henry
Diana Mara Henry

Diana Mara Henry photographed some of the most important events in the women’s movement, including the iconic image of the march to the First National Women’s Conference in Houston.

June 20, 1948
Cincinnati, Ohio
United States
Susannah Heschel
Susannah Heschel

As a scholar and author, Susannah Heschel has explored issues of Jewish feminism and 19th and 20th century German Jewish history.

May 15, 1956
Hillman-Bessie-1-cropped
Bessie Abramowitz Hillman

Bessie Abramowitz devoted her life to unions, organizing her first strike at fifteen, announcing her engagement on a picket line, and continuing her efforts for workers’ rights until her death.

May 15, 1889
Linoveh
Russia
Himmelfarb, Gertrude - still image [media]
Gertrude Himmelfarb

Gertrude Himmelfarb railed against the moral relativism and social-science-based work of the “New Historians” and argued for a return to the values of the Victorian era.

August 8, 1922
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Elizabeth Slade Hirschfeld

Elizabeth Slade Hirschfeld’s search for a way to make a difference led her first to become a Freedom Rider and then a public school teacher.

May 21, 1937
Detroit, Michigan
United States
Judith Hirshfield-Bartek - image [media]
Judith Hirshfield-Bartek

As an oncology nurse, Judi Hirschfield-Bartek raised awareness of the importance of genetic testing and environmental factors in understanding breast cancer.

1952
New Jersey
United States
Nicole Hollander
Nicole Hollander

Cartoonist Nicole Hollander used her comics to poke fun at misogyny and prove that feminists could be funny.

April 25, 1939
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Judy Holliday [media]
Judy Holliday

Judy Holliday won an Academy Award for her performance as the not-so-dumb blonde in Born Yesterday, a role she fought hard to play.

June 21, 1921
New York, New York
United States
Faith Holsaert
Faith Holsaert

Faith Holsaert was one of the first white women field workers for the civil rights movement in the south, volunteering for voter registration in one of the worst counties in Georgia.

1943
New York, New York
United States
Florence Howe
Florence Howe

Florence Howe’s Feminist Press not only created a platform for modern feminist authors and scholars but helped the American public rediscover amazing women authors who had been long forgotten.

March 17, 1929
New York, New York
United States
Paula Hyman
Paula Hyman

Paula Hyman’s work as a historian recovered the stories of Jewish women’s pasts, while her work as a member of Ezrat Nashim helped create new possibilities for their future by pushing the Conservative Movement to ordain women rabbis.

September 30, 1946
Boston, Massachusetts
United States

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on July 24, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people/toc/H>.

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