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Barbara Myerhoff

Credit: Photograph by Vincent J. Grass.
Courtesy of Sonia Press Fuentes.

People

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

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Showing 1 - 25 of 27
Name & Description
Date of Birth
Birth Place
Vicki Gabriner
Vicki Gabriner

As a radical activist for civil rights, feminism, and an end to the Vietnam War, Vicki Gabriner risked her life to transform the country at a time of tremendous upheaval.

1942
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Barbara Gaffin and Ethiopian boy
Barbara Gaffin

Barbara Gaffin brought international attention to the desperate circumstances of Ethiopian Jews and helped whole communities flee to Israel.

1954
Dorchester, Massachusetts
United States
Roberta Galler
Roberta Galler

Roberta Galler’s work for the Congressional Challenge marked a landmark civil rights effort, using six hundred depositions that blacks had been prevented from voting in the 1964 congressional election as evidence that the election was unconstitutional.

1936
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Mamie Gamoran

Mamie Goldsmith Gamoran chose to combat assimilation in America by writing children’s books on Jewish history and holidays that encouraged children to feel proud of their dual identities as Jews and Americans.

January 17, 1900
Long Island City, New York
United States
Annabelle Gamson

Annabelle Gamson’s performances of Isadora Duncan’s choreography were remarkable both in their own right and for the fact that Gamson performed them in her forties, at an age when most dancers chose to retire.

August 6, 1928
Bronx, New York
United States
Bird Stein Gans

At a time when ideas about childrearing were mainly shaped by philosophers like Plato or Rousseau with little actual research on child development, Bird Stein Gans cofounded and led the Society for the Study of Child Nature to better educate parents.

May 29, 1868
Allegheny, Pennsylvania
United States
Helene Gans

A firm believer in the importance of government regulations in protecting citizens, Helene Gans advocated for minimum wage laws, consumer protection, and relief for victims of WWII.

December 27, 1893
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Roz Garber
Roz Garber

Roz Garber evaded the KGB to bring hope to refuseniks in the USSR.

1950
Toronto
Canada
Cindy Gats
Cindy Gats

Gats served in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in the US Marine Corps.

Queens, New York
United States
Beverly Pepper and Carol Gilligan
Carol Gilligan

Arguing that men and women can have equal rights and still have fundamentally different perspectives, Carol Gilligan founded “difference feminism” and transformed the field of psychology.

November 28, 1936
New York, New York
United States
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsberg brought landmark cases for gender and racial equality before the Supreme Court, transforming the American legal landscape even before her historic appointment as the second-ever female Supreme Court justice.

March 15, 1933
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Ethel Gladstone
Ethel Gladstone

Ethel Gladstone only joined the US Army Nurse Corps at the tail end of World War I, but her service record shows how long a war’s impact can be felt after its official end.

September 21, 1893
Chicago, Illinois
United States
Miriam Glickman cropped
Miriam Cohen Glickman

One of the first white women to do field work for the civil rights movement in the South, Miriam Cohen Glickman was assumed to be black by the locals, who called her “bright,” a word for light-skinned African Americans.

1942
Indiana
United States
Gluck, Alma -- American soprano
Alma Gluck

Alma Gluck began her career as an opera singer, but it was her love of American folk songs that made her a bestselling musical artist.

May 11, 1884
Romania
Emma Goldman
Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman’s controversial beliefs made her many powerful enemies, but their attempts to silence her ironically led to greater protections of free speech in America.

June 27, 1869
Kovno, Kaunas
Lithuania
Shannie Goldstein
Shannie Goldstein

Shannie Goldstein used her creativity to outsmart the KGB, bringing information to and from refuseniks in the Soviet Union.

Lowell, Massachusetts
United States
Fanny Goldstein, first female Judaica librarian
Fanny Goldstein

Fanny Goldstein’s belief in the importance of ethnic and immigrant pride led to her creation of National Jewish Book Week.

May 15, 1895
Kamenets-Podolsk
Russia
Janice Goodman
Janice Goodman

Janice Goodman’s work on civil rights issues drove her to become a lawyer, arguing class action cases for women’s rights.

1935
Brooklyn, New York
United States
Maralee Gordon
Maralee Gordon

Rabbi Maralee Gordon helped found the Chutzpah Collective, a radical Jewish political collective that utilized the inclusion of women in religious rituals as a jumping-off point for making all Jews feel welcome in the Jewish community regardless of disability or sexual orientation.

Crystal Lake, Illinois
United States
Sally Gottesman
Sally Gottesman

As a teenager, Sally Gottesman lobbied for the first Saturday morning bat mitzvah at her synagogue; as an adult, she created groups for teens of both genders to discover a deeper connection to Judaism.

Lynn Gottlieb
Lynn Gottlieb

One of the first ten women rabbis, Lynn Gottlieb became a voice for peace between Jews and Muslims.

April 12, 1949
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
United States
Portrait of Rebecca Gratz
Rebecca Gratz

Through the schools and orphanages she created, Rebecca Gratz established a new model of religious education and made it possible for a new generation to identify as both fully Jewish and fully American.

March 4, 1781
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Blu Greenberg
Blu Greenberg

Arguing that feminism could become a way into Judaism instead of a reason to leave the faith, JOFA founder Blu Greenberg created new possibilities for Orthodox feminist Jews.

January 21, 1936
Seattle, Washington
United States
Aliza Greenblatt

Aliza Greenblatt’s career led her on two very different Jewish journeys, as a philanthropist who organized massive support for the State of Israel, and as a popular Yiddish poet.

1885
Azarenits, Bessarabia
Romania
Gloria Greenfield
Gloria Greenfield

Disturbed by growing anti-Semitism in the women’s movement, Gloria Greenfield left the movement and began creating documentary films that brought national attention to anti-Semitism in America and around the world.

Lexington, Massachusetts
United States

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "People." (Viewed on July 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/people/toc/G>.

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