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Encyclopedia

The Encyclopedia features over 1,700 biographies, 300 thematic essays, and 1,400 photographs and illustrations on a wide range of Jewish women through the centuries -- from Gertrude Berg to Gertrude Stein; Hannah Greenebaum Solomon to Hannah Arendt; the Biblical Ruth to Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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Showing 1826 - 1850 of 2020
Mina Tomkiewicz

Mina Tomkiewicz's first book, Tam si? tez zylo (There Life Also Went On), registers her own experiences as well as those of other Polish Jewish families transported in August 1943 from the Polski Hotel to Bergen Belsen. Bomby i myszy (Of Bombs and Mice), her only, highly autobiographical, novel was first published in a Hebrew translation in 1955 and in Polish in London in 1966.

Schenirer, Sarah 2 - still image [media]
Torah Study

The commandment of Torah study is a positive Biblical precept.

Jennie Tourel
Jennie Tourel

Jennie Tourel is universally regarded as one of the most distinguished vocalists of her time.

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Zelda Nisanilevich Treger

Zelda Treger belonged to the Nekamah (Vengeance) battalion, the Jewish unit under the command of Abba Kovner (1918–1987). As a courier, she was continuously sent to the city to obtain weapons, medicines, information on the army’s movements and even on rescue missions from the labor camp. Together with her fellow partisans, Treger participated in the liberation of Vilna.

Triangle Fire Headline, Oklahoma State Capital, Mar 26, 1911
Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

One of the worst industrial disasters in the history of New York City, causing 146 deaths and an unknown number of injuries, took place on Saturday, March 25, 1911, at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company.

Diana Trilling

The life of Diana Trilling has encompassed the rise and fall of the Jewish intellectual community centered in New York, and the literary and political journals that arose there after the Depression.Trilling’s formidable reviews and commentary, as well as her position among the liberal anticommunist critics of the Partisan Review, the Nation, and the New Republic, reflect an influential period of American social critique.

Marie Trommer

Marie Trommer was an early twentieth-century writer, poet, artist, art critic, and contributor to American Jewish newspapers.

Tuchman, Barbara - still image [media]
Barbara W. Tuchman

Barbara W. Tuchman was one of America’s foremost popular historians and winner of two Pulitzer Prizes for The Guns of August and Stilwell and the American Experience in China.

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Sophie Tucker

Sophie Tucker was an international star of vaudeville, music halls, and later film, performing in both Yiddish and English in a career that spanned over fifty years.

Rosalyn Tureck

Pianist Rosalyn Tureck has toured the world as a consummate interpreter of the keyboard music of Johann Sebastian Bach.

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Turkey: Ottoman and Post Ottoman

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, far-reaching changes took place in the Ottoman Empire in the political, social and geopolitical spheres.

Turniansky, Chava - still image [media]
Chava Turniansky

Professor Chava Turniansky is a leading scholar of Old Yiddish, which she views not just as the vernacular of fourteenth to eighteenth century Jewish society, but as a vehicle for understanding the literary, philological, historical and sociological mores of the period.

Malka Heifetz Tussman

Malka Heifetz Tussman served as a bridge between the generations of Yiddish poets who emigrated from Eastern Europe and of those American-born Jewish poets who have taken up the task of making Yiddish poetry known to a readership that knows little Yiddish.

Two Prostitutes as Mothers: Midrash and Aggadah

The Rabbis learned from the judgment of Solomon how a trial is to be conducted.

Two Prostitutes: Bible

Immediately after he requests that God grant him “an understanding mind to govern your people” (1 Kgs 3:9), King Solomon (reigned c. 968–928 b.c.e.) is confronted by two prostitutes and their enigmatic case.

Sophie A. Udin

An intelligent, determined, career woman, Sophie A. Udin was a feminist leader and activist who sought equality between the sexes, including equal pay for equal work and equal representation for women.

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Miryam Ulinover

With its feminine as well as religious perspective, original popular style and internal coherence, Miryam Ulinover’s poetry constitutes a chapter apart in Yiddish literature.

Liudmila Ulitskaia

Liudmila Ulitskaia is one of the best and most popular representatives of contemporary Russian realist prose; her works combine traditional plot and narrative techniques with an unusually candid treatment of conventionally taboo subjects such as sexuality and disease as well as previously censored topics in Russian history and religion.

Doris May Ulmann

One of America’s most accomplished but enigmatic pictorialists, Doris Ulmann is often mistakenly hailed as a pioneering documentary photographer.

Ungerleider, Joy - still image [media]
Joy Ungerleider-Mayerson

One of the leading Jewish philanthropists of the second half of the twentieth century, Joy Ungerleider-Mayerson left an indelible mark on a broad array of Jewish cultural, scholarly, and religious endeavors and institutions.

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Union of Hebrew Women for Equal Rights in Erez Israel

The Union of Hebrew Women for Equal Rights in Erez Israel which led the fight for women’s suffrage until 1926, continued to work for full and equal political, legal and economic rights for women until the establishment of the State in 1948, when it merged with the WIZO organization.

Union of Jewish Women

The Union of Jewish Women (UJW) was the first national umbrella organization for Jewish women’s social service groups.

Jean Starr Untermeyer

Jean Starr Untermeyer’s memoir, Private Collection (1965), recalls a childhood blighted by “fear of the loss of love.” The fear and the loss—and the love—shadowed her life, but they illuminated her art.

Uprising of 20,000 (1909)

On November 23, 1909, more than twenty thousand Yiddish-speaking immigrants, mostly young women in their teens and early twenties, launched an eleven-week general strike in New York’s shirtwaist industry. Dubbed the Uprising of the 20,000, it was the largest strike by women to date in American history.

Uri, Aviva 4 - still image [media]
Uri, Aviva

Aviva Uri has become engraved in our memory as a woman who realized her life as an artist, a gifted draftswoman whose work touched the roots of her existence and influenced an entire generation of artists. In the course of fifty years of creation she engaged only in drawing, uncompromisingly and without an iota of faking, and established her central place in the history and the language of Israeli art.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Encyclopedia." (Viewed on July 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/toc>.

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