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Encyclopedia

The Encyclopedia features over 1,700 biographies, 300 thematic essays, and 1,400 photographs and illustrations on a wide range of Jewish women through the centuries -- from Gertrude Berg to Gertrude Stein; Hannah Greenebaum Solomon to Hannah Arendt; the Biblical Ruth to Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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Myra Ava Freeman

The first Jew to be appointed lieutenant governor of a Canadian province and the first woman to hold the office in Nova Scotia, Myra Freeman was born in St. John, New Brunswick, as were her parents, Anne Golda (Freedman) Holtzman (1916–1986) and Harry Holtzman (1912–2004).

Stella Heinsheimer Freiberg

Two causes absorbed most of Freiberg’s energy: helping the arts flourish in her hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio, and furthering the growth of Reform Judaism—and the role of women in it—in the United States and Western Europe.

Freier, Recha - still image [media]
Recha Freier

By founding the Youth Aliyah (Jugend-Alijah) in Berlin, Germany in 1932, Recha Freier saved thousands of Jewish lives. She was a multi-talented woman, a poet and musician, a teacher and social activist. However, in most accounts of the Holocaust she has either been underestimated or totally unacknowledged.

Freiman, Lillian - still image [media]
Lillian Freiman

Unquestionably the most prominent Jewish woman in Canada in the interwar period, Lillian Freiman was born in Mattawa, Ontario, one of the eleven children of Moses Bilsky (1829–1923) and his wife, Pauline (née Reich, b. Berlin, 1857, m. 1875). From World War I until their death, the couple spearheaded Canadian Zionism, he as president of the Zionist Organization of Canada and she as head of Canadian Hadassah-WIZO.

Else Frenkel-Brunswik

Else Frenkel-Brunswik was a social psychologist who is best known as coauthor of The Authoritarian Personality.

Freud, Anna 2 - still image [media]
Anna Freud

Anna Freud's life was also a constant search for useful social applications of psychoanalysis, above all in treating, and learning from, children.

Gisèle Freund

With these words she described the extraordinary life and work of Gisèle Freund, European intellectual and writer, sociologist, historian of photography, a socialist, a Jew, and one of the world’s greatest photographers.

Miriam Freund-Rosenthal

Miriam Freund-Rosenthal combined a career in Hadassah leadership with an avid interest in Judaic scholarship, specializing in American Jewish history. Which was the “career” and which the “avocation” is difficult to say, since she found many avenues for intertwining her dual loves of Zion and of Jewish learning.

Friedan, Betty - still image [media]
Betty Friedan

Considered by many as the “mother” of the second wave of modern feminism, activist and writer Betty Friedan was one of the most influential feminist leaders of the second half of the twentieth century, a co-founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and its first president. She served on the boards of leading women’s organizations, fought for legislation to ensure women’s equality and wrote books analyzing women’s role in society and the women’s movement.

Jane Friedenwald

Jane Friedenwald, the daughter of German Jews and connected through marriage to one of the most prominent German Jewish families in Baltimore, was a valuable member of the new American Jewish aristocracy. She dispensed charity, created and supported American Jewish institutions, bettered herself intellectually and culturally, and raised her children to honor the family name and legacy.

Marta Friedländer-Garelik

Although her mother tried to convince her to study medicine, Marta preferred law. In the summer semester of 1918 Friedländer enrolled in Vienna University’s law faculty, where she was one of the first women to venture into these studies.

Carl Friedman

The style and themes of Carl Friedman's books has made her unique among Dutch authors.

Charlotte Friend

Cell biologist and immunologist Charlotte Friend made major contributions to our understanding of cancer and its causes.

Ida Weis Friend

Ida Weis Friend’s life of activism began when, at age fifteen, she raised money for a hospital fountain. Her community service, representative of women’s club work during the Progressive Era and beyond, encompassed religious organizations, the woman suffrage movement, mainstream politics, public health, child welfare, and cultural philanthropy.

Ruth Bernard Fromenson

Ruth Bernard Fromenson, a Zionist and Jewish communal worker, initiated the system by which vital supplies were sent to Palestine under the auspices of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America.

Frieda Fromm-Reichmann

A brilliant and gifted therapist, she emphasized communicating understanding in her innovative treatment of schizophrenics during her twenty-two years at Chestnut Lodge in Rockville, Maryland.

Barbara Frum

For some two decades, journalist Barbara Frum was one of the best known people in Canada.

Esther Frumkin

Esther (1880–1943) was the pseudonym of the Jewish educator, writer, and socialist-turned-communist, Malkah Lifchitz. Her married names were Frumkin and later Wichmann. An independent thinker and a unique woman in the Jewish labor movement, Esther devoted her life to leftist political activity in Russia and later the Soviet Union.

Lillian Fuchs

Lillian Fuchs is a legend among musicians and chamber music lovers throughout the world. She was a violist, teacher, and composer. Her musicianship and her concept of the viola’s glorious, dark, rich, human sonority continue to enhance and inspire the lives of musicians who studied with her, played her compositions, or had the privilege of hearing her wondrous, soulful playing.

Henriette Fürth
Henriette Fürth succeeded in earning a much-needed income as a highly-regarded lecturer and journalist. In addition to publishing, Fürst found time to be involved in organizational life.
Fuld, Carrie - still image [media]
Carrie Bamberger Frank Fuld

The daughter of German Jewish immigrant parents, Carrie Bamberger Frank Fuld was a philanthropist who, in partnership with her brother, department store magnate Louis Bamberger, founded the internationally acclaimed Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

Norma Fields Furst

Higher education was not merely a family priority; it also became Furst’s professional focus. Norma Fields Furst’s family believes that she was happiest when she served as president of Baltimore Hebrew University because the post allowed her to combine her talents as an educator with her commitment to Judaism.

Futoransky, Luisa - still image [media]
Luisa Futoransky

Poet, novelist, music scholar and journalist, Luisa Futoransky has led a life characterized by travel and the arts.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Encyclopedia." (Viewed on September 30, 2014) <http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/toc/F>.

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