You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Blog

Blog:
Jewesses with Attitude

Filter Posts

Showing 451 - 475 of 1587
Marijuana

Jewish women and marijuana: Yay or nay?

If you listen closely, you may hear people wishing one another a "Happy 4/20" today. Why?

Sharon Brous

Sharon Brous: On honors and journeys

There’s been a lot of press about Rabbi Sharon Brous lately, since she became the first woman to crack the top 5 on the Newsweek America’s Top 50 Rabbis list. Of course, this wasn’t the first recognition of Brous for her work building IKAR, a vital and exciting Jewish community in Los Angeles; she’s already been recognized by the Forward, Jewish Women International, the Jewish Community Foundation of LA, and others, who herald her as a leader in reimagining Jewish life for the 21st century.

Esther Wojcicki: A Jewish mother of the tech revolution

I sometimes direct tourists toward 'the HP garage,' which is marked with a plaque and gets photographed a lot. It is three blocks down the street from my house.

Piercy, Marge - still image [media]

How do I love Marge Piercy?

How do I love Marge Piercy? Let me count the ways:

alltumbledown

"Modern and Modest:" Interview with Nina of alltumbledown

When not memorizing Latin declensions, Nina, a graduate student of history, authors alltumbledown: a modest attempt at style, a blog about the intersection of modesty and daily fashion. In addition to brightly colored pencil skirts and everything sequined, she is a fan of Mad Men, the quickly-disappearing Jewish Lower East Side, and the printing press. She currently calls both Philadelphia and New York home.

Lucy Kramer Cohen portrait

Lucy Kramer Cohen: A public-spirited woman/a private inner life

Ever dream of making a film about someone you wanted the world to know more about?

Topics: Family, Mothers, Film

Passover recipe roundup

Tonight marks the fourth night of Passover, and you’re probably running low on leftovers from the first two nights’ seders (if you had any to begin with). Fear not!

2012 National Poetry Month Logo

Yiddish poetry: It's not just for men!

Most people believe that Yiddish literature and poetry was written solely by men. In reality, there were hundreds of female Yiddish writers and poets, all of whom had their own distinct biographies and writing styles.

Edith Kaplan Bregman was one of these women. She was born in a Russian shtetl in 1899 to a Hasidic family, immigrating to New York when she was 13. In America, she was exposed to literature that hadn’t been available in Europe, so she became a voracious reader. Bregman went on to write poetry in her native tongue, Yiddish. Her love of language led her to meet many Yiddish literary giants, like Avrom Reyzen, a poet who became her mentor. While she wrote poems throughout her early life, her works weren’t published until 1939, when a Yiddish newspaper had a poetry contest that she entered and won. Her victory gave her the confidence to publish more of her written work. Some of the themes that recur throughout her poems are a love of Judaism and God, life in Europe, and Holocaust remembrance. In addition to writing poetry, Bregman sang and played the mandolin and piano. Bregman’s last poem was published in 1997, a few years before her death at age 99.

Topics: Yiddish, Poetry
Lesléa Newman

How To Make Matzo Brei

It has to be Sunday morning,
not just any Sunday morning
the Sunday morning of Passover

Topics: Food, Passover, Poetry
Piercy, Marge - still image [media]

Matzoh

Matzoh

Topics: Food, Passover, Poetry
2012 National Poetry Month Logo

Liberation in poetry: Who Knows One

It should be easy to speak praise at a time of liberation. It is not.

Topics: Passover, Poetry
Artichoke Pesto with Matzah

Eating Jewish: Artichoke pesto with matzah

Reading through my copy of the Encyclopedia of Jewish Food by Gil Marks, I learned that artichokes are a common feature on the Passover tables of Italians and other Sephardim, since they usually first appear in early spring. I immediately knew that I wanted make this culinary tradition part of my own Passover celebrations. Yet, I have to admit that artichokes are one ingredient that intimidate me with their spiny outer leaves and inner choke that can be gag-inducing if not removed properly. Until I overcome my fear of artichokes (and for convenience's sake), I used using jarred or canned artichoke hearts.

Topics: Food, Passover
United States Postal Service

Passover Postage: Sending matzah to China

Two things I don’t understand about the US Postal Service: Why it’s the workers, not customers, who go “postal.” Secondly, how it could be in trouble when it has me.

2012 National Poetry Month Logo

Passover Poetry: Giving Miriam her song

In recent years, Miriam has become regular presence at the Passover table.  For some she is there in the form of Miriam’s cup, a ritual addition to the Passover Seder created by Jewish feminists. For others, she is invoked through Debbie Friedman’s joyous song, an occasion, at many seders, for women to sing and dance, continuing or reexperiencing the celebration of freedom, led by Miriam, upon crossing the Red Sea.   

Coconut Matzah Brei

Eating Jewish: Coconut Matzah Brei

I’m going to let you in on a little secret of mine: I actually like those tinned coconut macaroons that come out for Passover each year.

Topics: Food, Passover
Mayim Bialik's Bubbe

Cleaning for Passover, missing my Bubbe

 

I’ve started cleaning for Passover, have you?

Fava Bean Soup (Bessara)

Eating Jewish: Fava bean soup (Bessara)

I pride myself on constantly using and experimenting with a variety of ingredients when I cook. However, fava beans were one of those things that hadn’t made it into my culinary repertoire.

Topics: Food, Passover
Merle Feld, 2010

Passover Poetry: Studying the Mundane and Holy Terrain

Living as a poet means you are acutely attuned to the voices within, you seek to listen, to discern the words that best capture your own inner truth.

Topics: Passover, Poetry
Miriam in "The Songs of Joy"

Celebrating Miriam

Big sister. Song leader. Outspoken challenger. Prophet. In her many roles, Miriam is integral to the story of Exodus. Her legacy is complex, dynamic, and hopeful.

Topics: Passover, Bible
Miriam in "The Songs of Joy"

Faith is packing your timbrel

Last Pesach, I heard a sermon given in which my friend and rabbi used the phrase “faith is packing your timbrel” and I got super fixated on this concept and have found it running through my head in difficult times, a sort of mantra to reflect upon.

Topics: Passover, Music, Bible
2012 National Poetry Month Logo

Passover poetry: Re-telling the story of our own lives

National Poetry Month officially began yesterday. It is not altogether clear why the Academy of American Poets chose April as the month to celebrate poets and poetry.

Wine-stewed prunes with  Mascarpone Cheese

Eating Jewish: Not your bubbe’s compote

You're probably thinking that prunes don’t belong in the same sentence as dessert, let alone anywhere near the sweet finish of a meal.

Quajado

Eating Jewish: Quajado for Passover

Passover cooking is certainly defined by the dietary restriction of abstaining from chametz, or leavened grain.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Blog." (Viewed on July 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/blog>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Poll

Which topics pique your interest on the JWA blog?

Twitter

15 hr
Att. Bay Area Educators! The #jwaWorkshop is in two weeks, REGISTER NOW for two days of primary source study & more. http://t.co/00ndwsjekf
19 hr
Today on the blog, Mel honors Yiddish historian Chava Turniansky with a post about when your bf doesn't know Yiddish. http://t.co/vLPOiFtAS5
20 hr
Today in 1848 the Seneca Falls Convention began in NY. Headliners=Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. #Suffrage http://t.co/M9Z1eSuleY