Shavuot

An Un-Love Song

Share

Ruth in Boaz's Field

An Un-Love Song is written as a psalm to Shavuot, which is associated with one of the most beautiful, celebratory poems in history, the Song of Songs. However, it’s written in the style of a Lamentation, as a response to heartbreaking acts of aggression towards women and children in the misappropriated name of religion. The poem addresses current events against a backdrop of Biblical recounting, including the Mount Sinai experience, the sin of worshipping the golden calf, the subsequent breaking of the original Tablets, and the story of Ruth and Naomi. It is a decidedly feminist poem.

Eating Jewish: Shavuot isn't all about cheese

Share

Eggplant with Greek Yogurt Sauce
Lemon Lavender Yogurt Cake

It's about yogurt, too!

Eating Jewish: Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

Share

Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

It was a busy weekend here for me in Montreal.

The World's 'Most Influential' Jewish Women

Share

In honor of Shavuot, the Jerusalem Post printed a special supplement on “The Fifty Most Influential Jews in the World” — and there are only seven women in the list.

A link roundup to keep you busy during Shavuot

Share

On Shavuot:

  • What Shavuot teaches us about women [MyJewishLearning]
  • One woman’s search for the perfect blintz [Tablet]
  • Sarah Bernhard discusses Shavuot [Tablet]

On Elena Kagan:

May Podcast: A Conversion Story for Shavuot

Share

Arva Gray - photograph

Tomorrow starts the festival of Shavuot, a time of spiritual liberation that commemorates the ancient Israelites receiving the Torah at Mount Sinai. The holiday is also linked to the story of Ruth, a Moabite woman, and her relationship with her Israelite mother-in-law, Naomi. As recounted in the Book of Ruth, traditionally read on Shavuot, after Naomi and her daughters-in-law Ruth and Orpah all become widows, Naomi urges the two younger women to leave her and find new husbands.

How do we value women's work?

Share

Jewish Women Watching, the “anonymous, rabble-rousing, feminist collective,” performed an action this weekend in honor of Shavuot (a holiday once celebrated by bringing the first fruits of the spring harvest to the temple in Jerusalem).

Rising Voices

Poll

Which topics pique your interest on the JWA blog?