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Shavuot

An Un-Love Song

An Un-Love Song is written as a psalm to Shavuot, which is associated with one of the most beautiful, celebratory poems in history, the Song of Songs. However, it’s written in the style of a Lamentation, as a response to heartbreaking acts of aggression towards women and children in the misappropriated name of religion. The poem addresses current events against a backdrop of Biblical recounting, including the Mount Sinai experience, the sin of worshipping the golden calf, the subsequent breaking of the original Tablets, and the story of Ruth and Naomi. It is a decidedly feminist poem.

Eating Jewish: Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

It was a busy weekend here for me in Montreal.

The World's 'Most Influential' Jewish Women

In honor of Shavuot, the Jerusalem Post printed a special supplement on “The Fifty Most Influential Jews in the World” — and there are only seven women in the list.

A link roundup to keep you busy during Shavuot

On Shavuot:

  • What Shavuot teaches us about women [MyJewishLearning]
  • One woman’s search for the perfect blintz [Tablet]
  • Sarah Bernhard discusses Shavuot [Tablet]

On Elena Kagan:

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Shavuot." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/blog/shavuot>.

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