Science

Women in Science: Reflecting with Dr. Joan Feynman

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Dr. Feynman fought an uphill battle—she had the smarts and the ability, but she was living in a world that wasn’t able to support or encourage a woman in science. Realizing the realities of the academic culture, she relegated her ambitions to being an assistant to a male physicist. Luckily for all of us—and for the field of theoretical physics—the support of her brother helped her set her goals at being a “high-medium physicist.”

Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science?

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Excerpt from Gertrude Elion's college chemistry notebook

Being a woman in science isn’t an easy accomplishment. It’s a hard field to break into, and it’s a hard field to shine in. I reached out to a few of my friends who make their living through science, and they all agreed—this subject is tricky on so many levels. It’s hard to navigate, and the politics that get in the way end up being both external and internal. The article in the New York Times wasn’t a groundbreaking discovery—no one is shocked to hear that girls have it tough in the world of science. But it’s good to keep the conversation going—and to remind ourselves that we have shoulders like Gertrude Elion’s to stand on.

Friday Social Media BliNtz (Week 2)

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Blau, Marietta - still image [media]
Emma Goldman

Welcome to week two of the Friday Social Media BliNtz— like a blitz but tastier.

Gertrude Elion inducted into the Jewish-American Hall of Fame

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Gertrude Elion medal
Lillian Wald medal

JWA Woman of Valor Gertrude Elion has been chosen as the 2011 honoree to be inducted into the Jewish-Am

Remembering Judith Resnik, the first Jewish American woman in space

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Resnik, Judith - still image [media]
Judith Resnik in space

Judith Resnik never showed any particular interest in space travel – but when NASA began recruiting women and minorities, she decided to apply anyway.

What We Missed: June Link Roundup

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Is it just me, or did June fly by? Here are some things that happened:

We celebrated, discussed, and lamented the reality of women in the workplace:

Remembering Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow, Nobel Prize winning scientist and mother

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“A Jewish woman whose father-in-law is a rabbi, who keeps a kosher home, who invites her lab assistants to Passover seders, and worries about them catching colds is not the typical image of a Nobe

Can a girl have an Oscar and a Bunsen Burner too?

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Natalie Portman

The first thing I thought when I read this article in Monday's New York Times was "How cool! All these women are scientists?!" What immediately followed was the thought "Too bad." Too bad I never knew that Winnie from the Wonder Years loves math. Too bad I never found out that Blossom totally digs science. Too bad I had no idea that Queen Amidala was a super science nerd in high school, or I might have found the Star Wars prequels more interesting.

Girls in science, sure. But what about engineering?

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Women in Engineering

I got my copy of Ms. Magazine yesterday and in it, and was excited to see an article called “Girls Love Robots, Too,” about a group of girls in San Diego who started their own robotics team and have won honors in national robotics competitions. It talks about how it’s a big thing for girls to have their own team, since men outnumber women in engineering 73 to 27, and emphasizes that the girls are defying the stereotype that only boys like science and math.

Abby Shevitz -- a role model in the global fight against AIDS

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December 1 is World AIDS Day, established in 1988 by the World Health Organization to raise awareness and focus attention on the global AIDS epidemic. World AIDS Day reminds us that for many across the globe, the spread of HIV/AIDS is a very real, very present, part of every day life, and millions are suffering.The global AIDS epidemic can be difficult for some Americans to accept or understand.

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