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Poetry

Can I Ask You a Question?

Naomi Eisenberg’s spoken word poem Can I Ask You a Question? speaks for itself. Created in honor of her mother’s 25 years in the rabbinate, Naomi tackles questions of gender and equality in Judaism—and in our society at large.

An Un-Love Song

An Un-Love Song is written as a psalm to Shavuot, which is associated with one of the most beautiful, celebratory poems in history, the Song of Songs. However, it’s written in the style of a Lamentation, as a response to heartbreaking acts of aggression towards women and children in the misappropriated name of religion. The poem addresses current events against a backdrop of Biblical recounting, including the Mount Sinai experience, the sin of worshipping the golden calf, the subsequent breaking of the original Tablets, and the story of Ruth and Naomi. It is a decidedly feminist poem.

Adele at 100

What better way to end our chapter on poetry than with a poem by Ellen Steinbaum. Ellen's poem, "Adele at 100", is inspired by writer and teacher Adele Margolis. This particular poem is from her new book, Brightness Falls, which will be out in September.

Behind the Words: Reflections on the Poetry Process

Each poem I write is about a person or relationship and the feelings and sensations I associate with him/her/them/it. Some explore connections with friends or family, while others dissect my relationship with God or with myself. I usually write in moments of clarity—not as a means of working through an idea or problem. Rather the poem is a record of a conclusion or discovery I have made, or perhaps poses a question for which I have decided to seek an answer.

I Write to Pay Attention

Flannery O’Connor once said, “How do I know what I mean until I see what I’ve said?

I Reach for Words

I reach for poetry that draws out my breath when it is caught in my lungs; poetry that surprises my heart into movement, expansiveness when it is heavy and turns in upon itself; poetry that feeds the pit of empty in my stomach so that it rumbles again for fire and food. 

Tracing My Ancestry Through Poetry

A few years after my grandfather passed away, my mother mentioned that for years he had refused to eat Spanish olives. I asked her why, and she said that he could trace his family history back to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492 and that this was his form of protest.

When a Woman Cannot Mourn

The Women of the Wall have been fighting for a woman’s right to pray at the Western Wall since 1988.

Today’s featured poet, Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff, responds to the latest challenge facing these women- the right to say Kaddish and mourn at the Western Wall.

Travelogue for National Poetry Month

Throughout the month of April we will be introducing you to a wide variety of Jewish poets and their poetry.

I’m honored to present the first poet in the series, Annie Jacobs.

Putting “All Her Eggs in One Bastard” –– Happy Birthday, Dorothy Parker!

On August 22, 1893, a child was born who would make the world a decidedly wittier place.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Poetry." (Viewed on August 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/blog/poetry-0>.

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Twitter

16 hr
Today in 1921, novelist Jacqueline Susann was born. http://t.co/KqF2yMm8d6
1 day
@erikadreifus yay!! Thanks, that's so awesome
1 day
RT @erikadreifus: @jwaonline, you'll be happy to see this piece by one of your former Rising Voices fellows! http://t.co/87U4TxqYZJ