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Passover

Gluten-free Lemon Passover Cupcakes with Blackberry Jam and Lemon Glaze

This cake is not just for Passover, friends. And it's not even just for the Jews. I'm convinced that this is one that everyone will like.

Eating Jewish: Charoset medley

Although most, if not all, Jewish holiday meals use certain foods and dishes to symbolize various elements of the celebration, the seder meal does so in a way that is integral to the ritual of the meal itself. From the maror to the zeroah, each has its place in the structure of the seder. Of all these symbolic foods, charoset is definitely my favorite and I have to agree with Gil Marks when he says in the Encyclopedia of Jewish Food that it “is unquestionably the most flavorful and arguably everyone’s favorite of the seder foods.”

A Fifth Question for Passover

The Passover Seder offers an opportunity to remember more than just the exodus from Egypt and our desert wanderings.

Why Rachel Berry deserves our compassion

Recently in The Forward, Jay Michaelson compared four characters from “Glee” to the “Four Children” from the Passover seder tradition. What I loved about the piece was Michaelson’s point that for young Jews, Jewish identity is one variable in a multi-variable identity that youth will embrace, when and if they find it meaningful. What bothered me about the piece was the language Michaelson used describing Rachel Berry, the analogous “Wise Child,” as an “irritating control freak” and “intolerable.” It was particularly difficult to read this because, well, I used to be Rachel Berry.

Why, on this night, do we include women's voices?

In collaboration with JewishBoston.com, JWA are putting the finishing touches on a new Haggadah that highlights women's voices. (Keep an eye out for it next week.) As we've been thinking about seders and traditions and the different ways we could include women's voices in the Haggadah we're creating, I wanted to hear more from you about your traditions and how you include women's voices.

Miriam and the Passover Story

I'm sure I'm not alone when I say that Passover is my favorite holiday.

Eating Jewish: Moroccan chicken with olives and lemons

My inspiration for the dishes I write about on Eating Jewish come from a variety of places that range from the numerous cookbooks that I have around my apartment, articles concerning Jewish food in newspapers and magazines, or simply the ingredients that I happen to have on hand at the moment. However, for this dish my inspiration came from my own academic work concerning the Moroccan Jewish community of Montreal.

Eating Jewish: Coconut Jam

Nothing says summer to me like coconut; whatever form it comes in, its taste and smell evoke a beautiful summer day with the warmth of the summer sun on my skin (it also reminds me of a coconut suntan lotion I loved the smell of as a kid and which happens to be my first memory of its smell) Needless to say, I have always loved coconut and I will eat it in almost any dish, whether it is sweet or savory.

Extreme Passover Link Roundup 2010

Back to basics:

Bringing women to the table:

What's in an Orange?

As I prepare for Passover, I’ve been struck by the wide range of explanations given for why some Jews include an orange on a Seder plate.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Passover." (Viewed on March 31, 2015) <http://jwa.org/blog/passover>.

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The story behind the—AHEM—Pussy Pouch is even more interesting than it's provocative appearance. #DAMNsel http://t.co/AKSSLICRgJ
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New bios on http://t.co/ETF1BeBBCs include Judith Light, Kyra Sedgwick, Melissa Gilbert, and Lisa Edelstein-TV week! http://t.co/mdOxf1yGXn
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Take @jdforward's verrrry interesting survey about whether prepping for your seder is still "women's work" http://t.co/D9Pjqlan4o