Literature

Dear Wendy

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Wendy Wasserstein

When I was 15 years old, I was about to go on vacation with my grandparents and I needed a book. I picked up a collection of three of your plays (The Heidi Chronicles, Uncommon Women and Others, & Isn't It Romantic) that I’d been assigned to read for my ninth grade English class, but never gotten around to studying. I didn’t know anything about you or the plays before opening the book, but I was soon transported to a world of women who didn’t necessarily know exactly what they wanted out of their educations, careers, and relationships, but did know they wanted a great deal. Suffice to say, it greatly appealed to me.

Judy Blume: Still Our Voice

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When I heard that "Tiger Eyes" was being turned into a movie, I quickly turned to my friend circle to spread the news. Like any member of the facebook tribe, I immediately put a call out for Judy Blume fans—I figured if I was lucky, I could get someone to see Tiger Eyes with me when it comes out in June. I figured if I was really lucky, I could get someone to write a blog post for Jewish American Heritage Month about how Judy Blume affected their childhood.

Meet Faye Moskowitz, Writer and Teacher

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Faye Moskowitz, 2008.

You might expect a writer, at age 80-plus, to retire from the public eye. Not Faye S. Moskowitz. As chair of the English Department at The George Washington University, the acclaimed short story author still shapes the dialogue about Jewish American fiction and where it’s headed. She continues to give book talks and forge conversations between accomplished writers and aspirants. Her own work has sometimes been compared to that of famed Jewish American short story writer Tillie Olsen.

What am I doing here?

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The Journey Painting

Hazel Karr first contacted JWA because she wanted to add some biographical details to the article in the online Encyclopedia about her grandmother, Esther Kreitman. We struck up a correspondence with her and suggested she write a blog post about the differences between between her mother's artwork and her own.

Hazel Karr comes from a family steeped in art and literature. Her grandmother Esther wrote journal articles, translations, and novels, including the autobiographical  Der Sheydim Tants (Deborah) in 1946. Esther’s brothers were Issac Bashevis Singer, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1978, and Israel Joshua Singer, who wrote extensively in Yiddish. Esther’s son Maurice Carr had a long career in journalism in Paris and Israel; his wife was Hazel’s mother Lola; the daughter of another Yiddish writer (A.M. Fuchs), she painted throughout her life.

In this post, Hazel Karr searches for the meaning in her mother's paintings and in her own.

The Talmud: Repository of Wisdom or Masculine Tool of Oppression? Maggie Anton Weighs In

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Bookshelf and books

Writer Maggie Anton, whose "Rashi’s Daughters” series has sold 175,000 copies, believes that studying Talmud is the most feminist thing a woman can do. “Knowledge of Talmud is the key to halacha,” she says. Anton asserts that modern Jewish law is made at a table full of Talmud scholars, and that women can have a seat at that table.

Helène Aylon: Artist, Ecofeminist, Author

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Helene Aylon Book Launch Close up
Helene Aylon Projection and Crowd

The room was filled with an open, excited energy.

Putting “All Her Eggs in One Bastard” –– Happy Birthday, Dorothy Parker!

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Dorothy Parker

On August 22, 1893, a child was born who would make the world a decidedly wittier place.

Celebrating Gloria Stuart

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Deborah Thompson with great grandmother Gloria Stuart
Deborah Thompson's Book Butterfly Summers

It was fitting that Gloria was born on Independence Day. She was a firecracker: sharp, witty, energetic.

Nora, you may remember nothing, but we remember you

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Nora Ephron headshot; back cover of Crazy Salad
Nora Ephron book: I Remember Nothing

When Nora Ephron was young, she wanted to be Dorothy Parker.

When I was young, I wanted to be Nora Ephron. I still do.

Who would Cynthia Ozick’s Edelshtein envy now?

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Ozick, Cynthia - still image [media]

Reading Adam Kirsch’s excellent piece in Tablet on Isaac Bashevis Singer reminde

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Rising Voices

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