Israel

Landing the Triple: Female, Israeli, and First

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Anya Davidovich

Anya Davidovich, a sixteen-year old girl born in the USA, will be skating for Israel in the Winter Olympics. Her parents are Israeli, and most of her family lives in Israel. She is part of the first-ever pairs team to compete for Israel in the Olympics and the only female member of Team Israel. Anya will be carrying the flag for the Israeli delegation.

Paula Sinclair, JWA Director of Programs & Partnerships, interviewed Anya and her mother as they prepared for their trip to Sochi.

Poetry, storytelling, and multiple truths on Israel's Independence Day

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Israeli flag
2012 National Poetry Month Logo

As a historian, I spend a lot of time thinking about stories -- what stories we tell about ourselves and the world, what stories aren't told, how our narratives change depending on context, moo

Women should be seen AND heard in Israel

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Extremist Ulta-Orthodox groups in Israel are trying to erase images of women from public space.

Eating Jewish: Shabbat bread done differently

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Bejma (Tunisian Shabbat Bread)
Dabo (Ethiopian Shabbat Bread)

When I think of Shabbat dinner, one of the first things that comes to mind is the sweet, dense challah that I love so much. It has become so popular that it can be purchased in bakeries all week long, and like many of the iconic Jewish foods of North America (bagels, knishes, pastrami, and smoked meat, to name a few) it was introduced by members of the European Jewish community.

The thing about rings

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Upon her arrival in Israel this week, a friend of mine picked up this pretty, functional necklace:

 

 

Eating Jewish: Schnitzel

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Schnitzel
Schnitzel ingredients

When you ask people to think of Israeli food, more often than not, images of crispy brown falafel will dance before their eyes. Yet, when speaking of quintessential Israeli dishes, falafel does not stand alone. Another dish that is central to the culinary landscape of Israel is schnitzel.

Remembering Netiva Ben-Yehuda

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Netiva Ben-Yehuda
World Dictionary of Hebrew Slang

Many years ago I was sitting in a kibbutz dining hall in the north of Israel. One of the older members, a woman, was reminiscing about the equality of the sexes that supposedly existed when the kibbutz was founded.

Henrietta Szold and Emma Goldman: Star-crossed "Women of Valor"

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Goldman, Emma 2 - still image [media]
Szold, Henrietta 1 - still image [media]

December 21st is the winter solstice and this year it was also the date of a lunar eclipse. December 21st, however, is also a big day for two important "stars": Henrietta Szold and Emma Goldman, two very important women in JWA's online Women of Valor exhibit.

Submit your environmental activist before Tu B'Shevat!

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Flowering Cherry

Saturday is Tu B'Shevat, known as the "Jewish New Year for trees," the "Jewish Arbor Day," or the "Jewish birthday for trees." The holiday has an interesting history that, believe it or not, began with taxes.  Lenore Skenazy explains in The Forward:

Back about 2,000 years ago, Tu B’Shevat — literally the 15th day of the month of Shvat — was a tax deadline, of sorts. Any trees planted before Tu B’Shvat were considered to have been “born” the previous year. Those planted after Tu B’Shvat (or, perhaps those that started blooming after Tu B’Shvat) were part of the next year’s crop. As the amount of fruit you were required to tithe from each tree was determined by its age, this date was significant. And since the easiest way to remember a tree’s birthday was to plant it on that day, that’s what some folks did: planted.

What the Women of the Wall Want

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Women's Tefillah 1 - still image [media]

Anat Hoffman is director of the Israel Religious Action Center of the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism and chair of Women of the Wall.  This was originally published as an op-ed in The Forward.

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