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Education

This August we are raising an apple to our educators. As the back-to-school sales reach a crescendo (but before we start dipping our apples in honey for Rosh Hashanah), we are focusing on the experience of Jewish education. Education has always been a cornerstone of Jewish culture and religion, although girls and women had to fight to get the same opportunities as their brothers.

Women were actively involved in education from the first years of Jewish life in America. Over 350 years later, teachers continue to inspire students in day and supplementary schools, in pre-b'nai mitzvah and confirmation classes, in seminaries and yeshivas. During August, we are calling on educators to share their lesson plans, their surprising stories, their triumphs, and, yes, their failures. We will learn along side of them as we reflect on what it means to be the people of the book.

Bread & Roses, Raisins & Almonds, Labor & Sustenance

This week teachers from around the nation are participating in JWA’S Institute for Educators.

Breaking free from tradition: New ideas for Passover learning

Watch The Prince of Egypt. Throw the toy frogs. Have a chocolate seder. Create artistic interpretations of the Ten Plagues.

Learning and teaching bat mitzvah: It goes both ways

“But there’s so much to learn!” This is the traditional lament of every bat mitzvah girl I have tutored, and I’m sure it escaped my lips a few times when I was preparing for my own bat mitzvah as well. Between the prayers, the Torah portion, the Haftarah, the d’var Torah, and everything else a bat mitzvah entails, there is no doubt that in becoming a bat mitzvah there is quite a lot to learn. But I would like to offer an alternative framework: the bat mitzvah girl not as a learner, but as a teacher.

Domestic Abuse: “That Doesn’t Happen Here”

I confess that even at age 26, my usual reading list consists of young adult science fiction novels, usually set in the future (see: The Uglies series, The Hunger Games series, The Mortal Instruments series, and so on. Stop judging me – I want to be a YA author!) Recently, though, I challenged myself to break out of my comfort zone and read a few more adult novels, which led me to “The Murderer’s Daughters.”

Weekly Wrap-Up

MLK through a new lens

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day provides the Jewish community with a unique and multifaceted opportunity each year: it's a chance to turn our communal attention from its inward focus to a more outward-directed perspective. A chance to connect with our African-American neighbors. A chance to celebrate the man who still looms large as a model of religiously-inspired leadership. A chance to recall with pride a time when many Jews stood up for the rights of all people, black or white.

Living the Legacy: a new take on Jews and the Civil Rights Movement

As soon as I begin talking about the history of Jewish involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, a few names immediately come up in conversation: Abraham Joshua Heschel. Micky Schwerner.

Comparative Religion Isn't Just for Academics

An interesting article popped up on the side of The New York Times recently--an article about the lack of knowledge among Americans about religion, including about their own. The article discussed the fact that on average, Americans were only able to correctly answer 50% of the questions on a recent survey by the Pew Research Center on the teachings and history of major world religions.

Meet Elizabeth, JWA Intern

It is my third day here as a JWA intern. It is a privilege to be working at such a fantastic organization, and I am so grateful to everyone at JWA for their warm welcome. In my first-ever Jewesses with Attitude blog-post, I want to take this opportunity to share with you a little bit about my background and why I am so pleased to be here at the Jewish Women’s Archive.

Why I plan to be a "Student for Choice"

The end of summer marks the beginning of a relatively short but tumultuous season for the high school student: the college application process. The Common Application went up August 1, and with it came a slew of essays that students across the country must finish by January. Topics range from choice of major to hobbies to why you want to go to a particular school. I've been slowly working my way through them, and I found myself trying to answer the question of what activities I plan to pursue at college.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Education." (Viewed on May 22, 2015) <http://jwa.org/blog/education>.

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This #Shauvot, I'm ditching the cheesy recipes and asking women to stop cooking out of obligation @LilithMagazine http://t.co/Bb2JzzyCv5
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What does Golda Meir have to do with Meninist Twitter and Madeleine L'Engle? RVF fellow Ilana has some ideas http://t.co/KksXuhpRxv
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An original lesson plan+a healthy dose of creativity=what you need to win JWA's #Twersky Award. Apply now: http://t.co/gbrzXQyp8U