Civil Rights

Prinz, Persecution, and the Pursuit of Justice

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I’ve been working at the Jewish Women’s Archive since the day after Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 2011. In my almost-three years here, I have learned one thing above all else: in order to understand ourselves, to know our past, and to build our future, we must tell our stories. And this past week has been one of my most favorite weeks of story telling as every blog, news agency, and Facebook user has shared anecdotes, historical photos, and reflections of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Last week I highlighted some little-known historical facts about the March, including the involvement of Jews in the event. Since then, I have seen Rabbi Joachim Prinz’s name and words all over the Internet as Jews claim him as our own and passionately take up the legacy of his work for civil rights and social justice.

50 Years On: 5 Things I Learned About the March on Washington

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The Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the March tomorrow, I would like to share 5 things I have learned about the March on Washington that you may not already know—one for each decade. I hope you’ll take this opportunity to check your assumptions and look more closely at this monumental, game-changing event.

Dayenu. Dayenu. Dayenu.

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Image of Heather Booth and Fannie Lou Hamer

This past year, I took a group of seven teens on a tour of the American South. The trip was inspired by my desire to infuse young people with a sense of history and context as it relates to Judaism in the South and Jews in the Civil Rights Movement.

We began in Atlanta, then drove to Alabama, stopping in Birmingham, Montgomery, Selma, and many places in between. We met with people who had lived through segregation and fought against it. We saw the Rosa Parks Museum, experienced history, and talked about what it means to be an American Jew from the Northeast.

JWA Spotlights Jewish Women's Activism

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LTL Institute Photo

Like all large groups of people, American Jews are complex and irreducible despite some aspects of shared culture. Recently, the Jewish Women’s Archive made an interesting choice to focus a new curriculum on Jewish involvement in the labor and civil rights movements — without cheerleading or focusing solely on women’s involvement — thereby shining a probing light on that very complexity.

Dr. Judith Rosenbaum Talks Living the Legacy with Jewschool

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Don't Patronize Reds!

This fall, the Jewish Women’s Archive released its latest online curriculum in the Living the Legacy series, a Jewish social justice education

Interview with Mary Glickman (Part II)

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Mary Glickman is a writer, public relations professional, and fundraiser who has worked with Jewish charities and organizations.

Interview with Mary Glickman: Enthralling Author, Charming Mensch (Part I)

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Mary Glickman author shot
Home in the Morning by M. Glickman
One More River by M. Glickman

Mary Glickman is a writer, public relations professional, and fundraiser who has worked with Jewish charities and organizations.

What's With All The Teacher Hate?

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Chicago Teacher's Strike

Sarah Seltzer, contributing writer to the The Sisterhood, shares her thoughts on education, class, gender, unions, and workers' rights.

Breaking free from tradition: New ideas for Passover learning

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Watch The Prince of Egypt. Throw the toy frogs. Have a chocolate seder. Create artistic interpretations of the Ten Plagues.

Black History Month: Wednesdays in Mississippi

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You might think that I – a public historian – would love the opportunities on our public calendar to celebrate historical figures and communities. But truth be told, I’m a bit of a skeptic.

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