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Judith Rosenbaum

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Judith Rosenbaum
Judith Rosenbaum is a feminist educator, historian, writer, and activist—and the incoming Executive Director of the Jewish Women's Archive. A regular contributor to academic and popular publications, including Tablet Magazine, The Jewish Daily Forward, and The Huffington Post, Rosenbaum is currently co-editing an anthology about the modern Jewish mother. She's inspired by anarchist Emma Goldman, political activist Bella Abzug, writer and activist Grace Paley, and other loud Jewish women—including those in her own family.

Blog posts

Israeli flag

Poetry, storytelling, and multiple truths on Israel's Independence Day

As a historian, I spend a lot of time thinking about stories -- what stories we tell about ourselves and the world, what stories aren't told, how our narratives change depending on context, mood, timing.

Sharon Brous

Sharon Brous: On honors and journeys

There’s been a lot of press about Rabbi Sharon Brous lately, since she became the first woman to crack the top 5 on the Newsweek America’s Top 50 Rabbis list. Of course, this wasn’t the first recognition of Brous for her work building IKAR, a vital and exciting Jewish community in Los Angeles; she’s already been recognized by the Forward, Jewish Women International, the Jewish Community Foundation of LA, and others, who herald her as a leader in reimagining Jewish life for the 21st century.

Rich, Adrienne - still image [media]

Adrienne Rich: navigating hope

The news of Adrienne Rich’s death yesterday at age 82 sent me immediately to my bookshelves and an extended swim through the currents of words she has left behind. All writers believe in the power of words—and maybe especially poets, whose words are fewer and so carefully chosen—but for me Rich’s writing particularly and persuasively argued for the ability of words, language, expression to create new realities, to change the world.

Judith Rosenbaum

From Margin to March: What to make of Women's History Month

Here’s a not-so-secret little secret about me: I’m a major women’s history geek. I can go on about the stories of women’s lives for hours. Want to know about Emma Goldman?

Susan Rosenberg's "An American Radical"

Susan Rosenberg, An American Radical

I guess it’s inevitable, when you’re at a book talk by a 1970s radical political activist who was wanted by the FBI, went underground, got arrested, and spent 16 and a half years behind bars, that someone will ask  “How do you understand what you did and why?” Susan Rosenberg made an honest attempt to answer a complex question, ending with a shrug and the explanation, “That's a different book.”

Black History Month: Wednesdays in Mississippi

You might think that I – a public historian – would love the opportunities on our public calendar to celebrate historical figures and communities. But truth be told, I’m a bit of a skeptic.

Entitlement and its Discontents

This week, New York Magazine’s cover features an oral history of Ms. Magazine, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary.

Judith Frieze

Why do we act? Lessons from the Freedom Rides

Fifty years ago, in May 1961, a small group of civil rights activists embarked on a journey that would change them and change America. Boarding buses headed south for what they termed a "Freedom Ride," these young black and white activists challenged segregation by sitting together on the bus and in the waiting rooms of bus stations.  Though the Supreme Court had already declared segregation in interstate travel illegal, the Federal Government was not enforcing the law, so the Freedom Riders engaged in nonviolent civil disobedience to call attention to this injustice.

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking at the March on Washington

MLK and the Civil Rights Movement: Doing it Justice

When I say "Martin Luther King, Jr." what comes to mind? I would bet you see him standing at the Lincoln Memorial, overlooking a sea of people on the Washington Mall, and hear the evocative words of his "I have a dream" speech. I understand why King's speech at the March on Washington in August 1963 has come to represent his life's work and his legacy, and why the moment is celebrated as the height of the Civil Rights Movement.

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Jewish Women's Archive. " Judith Rosenbaum ." (Viewed on April 25, 2015) <http://jwa.org/blog/author/judith-rosenbaum>.

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“You are a feminist now Eliza. You are supposed to be better than this” Wrestling with the word #bitch in #highschool http://t.co/acOcb2Jtsv
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