You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Jordan Namerow

Jordan, an adventurous quirky Jewess, has frolicked from Wellesley, MA to Warsaw, Poland (where Jewish feminists are few and far between), and is learning about the world and often wondering. Inspired by the poetry of Adrienne Rich, the public health activism of Lillian Wald, and countless other feisty women whose misbehavior has rocked the globe, Jordan balances her blogging with plenty of jogging and prefers mountains to metropolis.

Blog posts

Klezmer, Ladino, and New Music Fusion

I always have an ear out for new music, especially music that brings together sounds and styles from different parts of the world. Two of my favorites include the music of the Afro-Celt Sound System and Rebbe Soul, both of which are quite innovative and energizing.

Rona Shapiro Makes History in Cleveland

Over thirty-five years have passed since a small New York study group—which grew to become Ezrat Nashim—set out to study the status of women in Judaism, and presented Conservative rabbis with a manifesto entitled “Jewish Women Call for Change” at the Rabbinical Assembly convention. This effort significantly influenced the Conservative movement’s decision to ordain female rabbis in 1983, and brought about many other advancements in equalizing women’s participation in Jewish ritual.

Goodbye, Barbie. Hello, Bratz.

If the doll industry is any measure of today’s commodified standard of beauty, assimilation is out and multi-ethnic is in. Forty-eight years have passed since Barbie came to represent the ultimate American fantasy: a leggy, blonde-haired, teeny-waisted preeminence of elegance, with a flamingo pink sports car and Ken by her side. Despite Mattel’s attempts to recreate and diversify Barbie’s identity to reflect social trends and more eclectic “girl” activities, Barbie has had trouble keeping up with the times, even if she does wear a tallit.

The Politics of “Chick”

I’ve often been labeled a word-nerd, an identity that I happily embrace. I enjoy playing with polysyllabic words like mellifluous and synchronicity, and find few things more deliciously delightful than alliteration (this, I discovered, I inherited from my mother whose personal ad in a mid-‘70s edition of the Village Voice included “attractive, alluring, alliterative” as part of her self-description which, as it turns out, charmed the Bronx boy who would become my father). Fortunately, I am in good word-nerd company at JWA.

Topics: Feminism

Summer Greening for Hadassah

In keeping with the theme of Jewish eco-friendliness, it’s worth mentioning that Hadassah, the women’s Zionist organization of America, has recently gone green! An increasing number of Jewish organizations and synagogues are becoming more environmentally responsible by making commitments to energy conservation, renewable energy programs generated by wind,

The Fitness of My Food

This is my first summer joining a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) Co-op. For those who aren’t so familiar with local food production, a CSA consists of individuals who commit to sharing the benefits and risks of local farming, and enjoy several months of fresh vegetables at a great value. As a CSA Co-op member, I buy a “share” of the farm’s produce which helps cover costs of the farm operation and pays the farmer a living wage.

Topics: Food, Agriculture

Tisha b'Av and Violence Against Women

Tonight marks the start of Tisha b’Av, a day of fasting and mourning for the Jewish community. Traditionally, Tisha b’Av commemorates the destruction of the temples in Jerusalem, but for many Jews, it has a more universal purpose to mourn all kinds of physical and emotional destruction: global warming, pollution, war, illness, starvation, genocide, and violence.

Topics: Tisha B'Av

Kippah-Wearing Jewesses

Confession: I am a progressive Jewish feminist with a strong aversion to wearing a kippah. I often parade around town wearing men's cargo shorts, I sport short-and-spiky fauxhawk-ish hair, and can feel at home in a tie and blazer over baggy khakis. I usually wear a tallit when I pray. But wearing a kippah in synagogue makes me feel shockingly unfeminine and terribly self-conscious.

Quinceaneras = Bat Mitzvahs?

One might not expect to hear “Bat Mitzvah” mentioned in a news report about a rural town with Mexican immigrants whose largest employer is a pork processing plant. But this morning I did. I was listening to a story on NPR about immigration issues in Beardstown, Illinois, a historically white rural community.

Topics: Ritual

Learning & Leading for Orthodox Women

The few times I’ve visited Teaneck, New Jersey (usually to dine at a Kosher restaurant since my nearby hometown is devoid of one), the sidewalks have a dizzying glare of bobbing black hats. There are about 15 synagogues within a five-mile radius, each with women’s balconies that I suspect are scant on leg room and a view of the bimah.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. " Jordan Namerow ." (Viewed on July 30, 2014) <http://jwa.org/blog/author/jordan-namerow>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Poll

Which topics pique your interest on the JWA blog?

Twitter

4 hr
Talking #Israel with German dignitaries http://t.co/r1YEpzGQCS
4 hr
Register now for next week's Bay Area Workshop for Jewish Educators: http://t.co/01rhHayXGo #jwaWorkshop #jewished http://t.co/oGIHY8pWe5
9 hr
Today in 1894, Blanche Wolf Knopf, longtime leader of the publishing company Alfred A. Knopf, was born. http://t.co/plf99OYBe6