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Jordan Namerow

Jordan, an adventurous quirky Jewess, has frolicked from Wellesley, MA to Warsaw, Poland (where Jewish feminists are few and far between), and is learning about the world and often wondering. Inspired by the poetry of Adrienne Rich, the public health activism of Lillian Wald, and countless other feisty women whose misbehavior has rocked the globe, Jordan balances her blogging with plenty of jogging and prefers mountains to metropolis.

Blog posts

What if a Jew Becomes a Jewess?

A few months ago, I got a call from my mom, a university professor, who had a student she described as “extremely androgynous with a unisex name.” She didn’t know how to address this student using a pronoun and asked me: “What should I do? What should I say?” I didn’t have a good answer.

Justice, Community, and Adrienne Rich

April is National Poetry Month, and over the past few days I’ve been re-reading some poems by my favorite poet, Adrienne Rich. There’s so much that I love about Rich and her writing. I love how powerfully—and radically—she fuses political commitment and the pursuit of justice into her poetic vision. She writes provocatively on sexuality, race, language, power, and women’s culture as she combats racism, militarism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism.

A Jewess In Command!

Big news! Earlier this week, National President of Hadassah, June Walker, was nominated as the Chair of the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations. The Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations has (shockingly) had only one woman Chair in its history: Shoshana Cardin who served from 1990-1992.

Women Who Go the Distance

Today is the Boston Marathon, the oldest annual 26-miler; the "granddaddy" of road races. In just a few hours, hundreds of bodies will whiz through the city, pounding the pavement right outside my window. Without feeling side cramps, pulled hamstrings, or the throbbing of achy joints, the marathon is, from a spectator's vantage point (and perhaps from an ecstatically adrenaline-jacked runner's standpoint, too), a rather exhilarating, life-affirming, freeing experience. And yet, the opportunity to feel such freedom and exhilaration wasn't always afforded to everyone.

Topics: Athletes

What's in an Orange?

As I prepare for Passover, I’ve been struck by the wide range of explanations given for why some Jews include an orange on a Seder plate.

JTS Welcomes Gays and Lesbians!

Earlier today, the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) announced its decision to open its doors to gay and lesbian rabbinical and cantorial students, a decision that is effective immediately!

Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen

There is a new audio podcast on Nextbook of an interview with political activist and writer Alix Kates Shulman -- featured in JWA's online exhibit Jewish Women and the Feminist Revolution -- about her first novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen. Click here to download or listen to the Nextbook podcast.

Lady Doctor, Woman Rabbi, Female CEO... President

Just a few months ago, I received an e-mail from someone who expressed appreciation for JWA but took issue with the phrase “women rabbis,” a phrase that often appears in Jewish Women’s Archive features including This Week in History and Jewish Women and the Feminist Revolution. Her point was this: for a feminist organization that does empowering work, there is something unseemly and demeaning about modifying rabbi with woman when we wouldn’t dare do the same thing with man.

Funny, You Don't *Look* Jewish...

Last week’s New York Times article “Journey from a Chinese Orphanage to a Jewish Rite of Passage” got me thinking more about the complexities of reconciling an adoptive Jewish identity with a non-Jewish biological heritage. The article follows the story of a Chinese girl named Cece adopted by a lesbian couple in the early 1990s when China first opened its doors to international adoption. About three weeks ago, Cece became a Bat Mitvah, one of the first Chinese adoptees of her cohort to do so.

Happy International Women's Day!

Since its first observance in the early 1900s, at a time of rapid industrialization, economic expansion, and a rise in radical ideologies, International Women’s Day has grown from its socialist roots into a global day of recognition and celebration in developed and developing countries alike.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. " Jordan Namerow ." (Viewed on December 19, 2014) <http://jwa.org/blog/author/jordan-namerow>.

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Today in 1979, Amy Beth Sheridan became the first Jewish woman pilot in the U.S. Army. http://t.co/KJbXOVXtcW
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