The American Jewess

Julie Rosewald: America's first woman cantor

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Julie Rosenwald

She wrote a book. She was an actress. She sang opera. She became a professor. She toured the world by herself. She paid her own way. She was a musical superstar.

Annie Londonderry and the bicycle as a vehicle of social liberation

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Annie Londonderry

Over the past couple years, we have witnessed the rise of an eco-friendly, politically progressive bike culture in the US.

Household hints from the "American Jewess"

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Take a look at these "household hints" published in American Jewess in January, 1896. Published between April 1895 and August 1899, The American Jewess was the first English-language publication directed to American Jewish women. I wonder what household hints American Jewesses would share today?

Fetishizing the Jewess

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From "The rise of the hot Jewish girl" in Details magazine.

Jewish women are hot right now. According to an article in the men’s magazine Details, “Jewish women have become the ethnic fetish du jour.”  And in true men’s magazine fashion, Christopher Noxon revels in the opportunity to eroticize and exoticize Jewish women; using dehumanizing terms like “cultural mutt” and “JILF,” meaning “Jew I’d like to…” -- you get the idea. 

This article does little more than call attention to the misogynistic trend it then goes on to abuse for shock value, and Irin Carmon does a great job of breaking it down at Jezebel.  Yet the use of the word “Jewess” in the article was particularly troubling for me, as a Jewesses with Attitude blogger.  Given the continued derogatory use of the word “Jewess,” can the term ever really be reclaimed?  And how do Jewish women feel about being the object of a sexual fetish?

Electricity applied in a "strictly scientific manner"

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I recently began a fun Twitter project, tweeting tidbits from American Jewess, the first English-language publication directed to American Jewish women (and this blog's namesake), edited by the original Jewess, Rosa Sonneschein.  Today I came across this ad from the October 1895 issue, and almost fell out of my chair.

'The American Jewess' on Twitter!

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Rosa Sonneschein, creator and editor of The American Jewess, is on Twitter!

The American Jewess, published between 1895 and 1899, was a magazine for the contemporary Jewish American woman.  (It also gave us the idea for 'Jewesses With Attitude.')  The magazine covered a range of topics, including Zionism, health and fashion, marriage, travel, and the propriety of women riding bicycles. 

More on Jews, Jewesses, and Thanksgiving

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Apropos of Ellen's comment about "what makes Thanksgiving so meaningful for some American Jews" in her prior post, I thought I'd share an excerpt from an article published in The American Jewess in November 1896.

A Day at Camp

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Last week, I got an e-mail from a Jewish Women's Archive member, which was, in part, an ode to Sara Blum, the founding director of Camp Navarac in the Adirondack Mountains. And, since it's July and since I spent last weekend with my band of camp friends, I'd be remiss if I didn't write a little bit about summer camp.

The American Jewess: An American Jewess in Paris

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As a new crop of college graduates ponder their uncertain futures and decide whether to go directly to work (if they can find work in this uncertain economy) or bum around for a while in search of inspiration, I thought it would be fun to find out what passed for "backpacking through Europe" in the turn-of-the-20th-century world of The American Jewess.

The American Jewess: Jewish Weddings in 1898

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Chuppah

by, Rebecca Hoenig Friedman, cross-posted on Jewess

It's June. Wedding season is officially upon us, and with it, a return to our feature on The American Jewess after a brief hiatus.

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